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PC28.05.18   shiebler

INVENTORY OF PC-DOCS, JANUARY—JUNE 1928

28.01.04 BROWN
28.01.04 BROWN
28.01.04 HUNT
28.01.05 KILCOURSE
28.01.08 SATTERFIELD
28.01.08 WADBROOK
28.01.21 SHAW
28.01.22 PEARD
28.01.31 KENYON
28.02.03 PEARD
28.02.04 MCDONALD
28.02.06 YOUNG
28.02.12 WATERMAN
28.02.18 GEYER
28.02.19 CLARK
28.02.19 GRAY
28.02.21 ORR
28.02.22 SHIEBLER
28.02.23 WELLS
28.02.24 SHIEBLER
28.02.24 ROCKEY
28.02.25 BROWN
28.02.26 CLARK
28.02.26 HOLMES
28.02.26 RIDDERHOF
28.02.27 GEYER
28.02.28 HUNTER
28.02.29 CLAUDE
28.02.29 CRONMILLER
28.03.01 O'DAY
28.03.05 MCNULTY
28.03.05 ROCKEY
28.03.11 AIKEN
28.03.15 CHAPPELL
28.03.16 ARTHUR
28.03.18 RIDDERHOF
28.03.22 ROCKEY
28.03.28 HUNTER
28.03.28 GEYER
28.04.05 ATKINSON
28.04.05 HART
28.04.05 ROBERTS
28.04.05 ROCKEY
28.04.08 HOLMES
28.04.09 PUTNAM
28.04.11 PUTNAM
28.04.11 SNEAD
28.04.15 HATFIELD
28.04.16 STOCKS
28.04.17 AIKEN
28.04.18 GALT
28.04.19 ESAU
28.04.19 MARSHALL
28.04.19 SNEAD
28.04.23 GALT
28.04.23 WILLIS
28.04.23 MCQUEEN
28.04.26 PEFLEY
28.04.28 MCQUEEN
28.04.30 ARNETT
28.05.06 HART
28.05.07 MERRITT
28.05.08 AIKEN
28.05.08 CLARK
28.05.09 KILCOURSE
28.05.11 AIKEN
28.05.11 ESAU
28.05.12 KILCOURSE
28.05.12 PEFLEY
28.05.14 HOLMES
28.05.16 CLAUDE
28.05.16 CRAMER
28.05.17 RIDDERHOF
28.05.17 ADAMS
28.05.18 SCHIEBLER
28.05.20 O'DAY
28.05.21 JENKINS
28.05.21 KENYON
28.05.22 CRAMER
28.05.24 CLAUDE
28.05.24 CRAMER
28.05.25 PIPER
28.05.25 PIPER
28.05.25 UNKNOWN
28.05.30 HATFIELD
28.06.01 SCOTT
28.06.04 HOLMES
28.06.04 O'NEIL
28.06.04 SNEDEKER
28.06.06 YOUNG
28.06.15 BROWN
28.06.16 ANDERSON
28.06.19 BERRY
28.06.20 HUMPHREY
28.06.20 ROCKEY
28.06.24 CRAMER

28.05.18.   Shiebler, Patrol Report, Yalí

P C - D O C S :      P A T R O L   &   C O M B A T    R E P O R T S
thru 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 +

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55th Company, 2nd Battalion, 11th Regiment.

Yali, Nicaragua.
18 May 1928.

From: Second Lieutenant Prentice A. Shiebler, U.S.M.C.
To: The Area Commander, Ocotal, Nicaragua.
Via: The Commanding Officer.
Subject: Patrol Report.

      1. A dismounted patrol from the 55th Co. 2nd Battl 11th Rgt. consisting of 26 marines, 2nd Lieut. Prentice A. Shiebler, commanding, and 2nd Lieut. Robert H. McDowell second in command, left Yali at 0500 May 12th 1928, to reconnoiter the La Rica-La Constancia area. Six mules were taken to carry blanket rolls and rations.

FIRST DAY:- The patrol covered the San Antonio, Las Vegas, La Rica area. There were few people in La Rica but some information was obtained that a bandit band had crossed north of there toward the east. Patrol camped at 1800, distance traveled that day 29 miles.

SECOND DAY:- Patrol reconnoitered La Constancia-Juan Flores area, patrolling to east and west on side trails, and visiting native houses. Few houses in this area and less people. Information obtained that bandit bands had passed thru that area on May 10th and 11th and were probably in the mountains to the Eastward. Total distance covered that day 22 miles.

THIRD DAY:- Patrol reconnoitered Cerro Partidas, Campania, Santa Rita, Quilali area. Area appeared normal. Information obtained at Santa Rita that bandit bands had moved east along Coco River and were in Cuchellas [Cuchillas] mountains. Due to shortage of rations the patrol traveled to Quilali for rations. Distance traveled third day 21 miles.

Fourth Day:- Quilali was short of rations but was able to furnish us with enough for three light meals. Patrol left Quilali and reconnoitered Pamali-Santa Cruz area, making several detours from main trail to the Coco, and following small hidden trails. No natives encountered, area entirely deserted. Arrived in vicinity of Santa Cruz and pitched camp. Two aeroplanes flew over and dropped a message from area commander to Lieutenant Humphrey's patrol stating Captain Hunter had signaled for reinforcements. Another drop stating that message was not for me but for Lieutenant Humphrey, but that he could not be found, would I join Captain Hunter. Signaled answer "Yes". After an hours rest, the patrol had already done 22 miles that day, and were on foot, I started down Coco toward Cua. I had no guide as I had not expected to travel that far east. I know the trails in the other area. The trail was lost after we had traveled about five miles, and as there was no suitable camping place I returned to camp and rested. Distance traveled that day 32 miles. [ p. 2 ]

FIFTH DAY:- A native boy about 14 years old with a native woman came by our camp at night. He was questioned concerning trails to Paso Real de Cua and Pena Blanca. He stated that he know them as he had once worked at the Hacienda at Santa Cruz so he was engaged as a guide. Patrol cleared Santa Cruz area at 0400 for Paso Real de Cua. The guide took us on an unfamiliar trail which lead thru the mountains and then down towards the Pantasma River. He stated that this was the easiest and quickest route as it avoided many of the bad parts of the mountain trail. After traveling for six hours I was convinced that he had lead us on the wrong trail, and that to go back to Santa Cruz would cost us a days time. I believed that if I continued on I could find a trail branching off to the left over the Cuchillas Mountains. The patrol kept on till 1800 when we were forced to stop at Tuma Yunca [Tumayunca] as the men were exhausted and the mules in worse condition. I intended to rest for a while and clear in the night via the trail from Tuma Yunca east to Paso Real de Cua. From the natives in that area I found out that a Marine Patrol had come from Jinotega and had passed by the trail to Pena Blanca the evening before. That day we had hiked nearly thirty one miles, making the total to date 135 miles, three of our mules in such bad condition that they could not carry a pack, and the others were in bad shape. That night one of the men became very sick, three others had feet that were in bad condition, and every one was very tired. We had been eating only two scanty meals a day and that night we used up the last of our rations. I looked for a guide to take us toward Pena Blanca but could only find one who seemed unwilling to go but finally agreed to show us part of the way till day light, after that I believe I could of found the rest of the way.

SIXTH DAY:- The patrol started for Pena Blanca area but I met more natives who convinced me that a patrol had gone in that direction from Jinotega, and I found tracks of hobnail shoes on the trail so decided that it would be better to return as natives told me it was over thirty miles from there and I did not think my men could possibly make it or if they did they would not be in any condition to be of service when they arrived, also we had no more rations, and by then I was sure a patrol was on its way there a day ahead of us. The patrol then proceeded to San Rafael as the men were exhausted and suffering from hunger. Distance traveled that day 22 miles. They had nothing to eat but one egg a piece in the morning which I got from some natives. They were fed well at San Rafael and had a good rest.

SEVENTH DAY:- Proceeded from San Rafael to Yali, arriving at 12.50 May 18th 1928.

     Weather during entire period was good. Trails dry and good but hilly and rock in some places. There were very few places which afforded feed for the mules and for that reason they had little to eat and were in bad shape on arrival in Yali. Very few natives or native houses encountered so no native rations were able to be procured for the patrol. Total distance traveled 172 miles.

     2.   On previous patrols I had been able to supplement my rations with food purchased from natives but was unable to do so in this area. Patrols operating in this area should not rely on native means of subsistence as there is very little if any.

/s/ P. A. Shiebler

127/204/3

Summary & Notes:

   28 Marines on 7-day patrol from Yalí to Quilalí area and back again; est. 172 miles (avg. ~25 miles / day).
Palpable sense of Marine suffering — long marches over rugged, sparsely populated terrain; scant food, sore feet; one Marine gets "very sick" after 31-mile march on day 5.
   Airplanes working to coordinate ground patrols:  Lt. Shiebler, Lt. Humphrey, Capt. Hunter.
   Difficulty of finding guides; vast wilderness with few people, no fodder, little food.
   Boy, 14, used as guide; once worked at hacienda Santa Cruz (owned by EDSN Col. Guadalupe Rivera, cousin of EDSN Colonel Abraham Rivera); takes patrol on the wrong trail then disappears from narrative.

   No sign of EDSN or bandits.

P C - D O C S :      P A T R O L   &   C O M B A T    R E P O R T S
thru 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 +

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