Header image
PC27.11.20   bellinger

INVENTORY OF PC-DOCS, THRU 1927

24.02.18 BOURKE
24,03,24 BIRNBAUMER
27.05.19 CHAPPELL
27.06.07 SWANSON
27.06.22 RICHAL
27.07.16 HATFIELD
27.07.20 HATFIELD
27.07.28 HATFIELD
27.08.12 FLOYD
27.08.18 BRUCE
27.09.04 O'SHEA
27.09.05 MCQUADE
27.09.08 CHAPPELL
27.09.20 KENYON
27.09.22 PEARD
27.10.12 O'SHEA
27.10.18 SATTERFIELD
27.11.02 CHAPPELL
27.11.02 GOULD
27.11.06 PEARD
27.11.07 BELLINGER
27.11.10 KEIMLING
27.11.11 BROWN
27.11.12 HARBAUGH
27.11.13 CRUM
27.11.14 DARNELL
27.11.19 WELLS
27.11.20 BELLINGER
27.11.26 KEIMLING
27.12.06 PEARD
27.12.07 BROWN
27.12.11 BROWN
27.12.11 KEIMLING
27.12.11 HARBAUGH
27.12.15 BROWN
27.12.17 CRONMILLER
27.12.18 MARTIN
27.12.19 WELLS
27.12.31 GOULD

27.11.20.   Bellinger, Report of Patrol, Somoto

P C - D O C S :      P A T R O L   &   C O M B A T    R E P O R T S
thru 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 +

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

     Introductory Note:  This report was featured in Revista de Temas Nicaragüenses (RTN) No. 92 (Dec. 2015), pp. 268-71.  The Spanish translation appears below the English original.  This is an excellent report to use in class — I've had students divide into groups and act out the first paragraph, to convey a more vivid sense of the nature of the Marines' counterinsurgency campaign, and as a way to emphasize the importance of using one's historical imagination when reading and interpreting such documents.  Having students role-play this report requires the following groups of actors:  (1) the two Nicaraguan men sitting in front of the house, (2) the woman inside the house, (3) 2nd Lt. Bellinger, Pvt. Rue, Pvt. Joyner, Sgt. Patterson, and two unnamed Marines (six Marines total, including Bellinger).  Encourage the students to consider the implications of the period of time when Lt. Bellinger and Pvt. Joyner were inside the house with the lone woman; to reconstruct the sequence of events that led to the deaths of the two men; and to consider what happened to their corpses and how that might be interpreted by locals.  I thank José Mejía Lacayo for featuring this report in RTN and for the translation into Spanish.


UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS
Marine Detachment
Pueblo Nuevo, Nicaragua
20 November, 1927

From: Second Lieutenant George H. Bellinger, U. S. Marine Corps.
To: The Area Commander, Ocotal, Nicaragua.
Subject: Report of Patrol

   1.    I left Somoto with a patrol of five men and one pack animal about 0900, Sunday, 20 November, 1927, enroute to Pueblo Nuevo. About two leagues out of Somoto I came in view of a house situated on a hill about 75 yards off to the right of the road. Two men were sitting at the right corner of the front of the house conversing. My attention was drawn to their suspicious actions which caused me to order them down to the road. One of the men passed something to the other and then came on down. The other went to the door of the house and handed something to the woman inside. I had to call sharply two or three times to that man before he finally came. Private Arthur W. Rue and Private Howard C. Joyner accompanied me to search the house while the other marines kept the men on the road. We searched the house and found three war type machettes and one other working machette. I sent Private Rue out to search the back of the house and he found two 38-caliber pistols hidden in the brush close to the house. These pistols had four shells in one of them and one shell in the other. We continued our search in the brush and found nothing more. The bandits' arms were properly and securely tied behind their backs and I had the bandits placed in front of the patrol under the care of Sergeant Frank B. Patterson and Private Rue. The bandits were several times warned to stop talking to each other, and continued walking ahead. About a half league down the road as the prisoners were rounding a bend they suddenly tried to duck into the thick brush. I heard Sergeant Patterson call to them to halt but they did not pay any heed and so both Patterson and Rue fired on and killed them. We put their bodies on the side of the road in the brush and continued on.
 
   2.    At about 1700 two leagues distant from Pueblo Nuevo we were suddenly surprised by a native charging down on us waving a machette in a menacing way. He had apparently been but recently in a fight, for he was bloody about the neck and front of his shirt and showed fresh scars on his neck and face. We finally managed to stop him and get his war-type machette away from him without anyone being cut up. He had apparently been drinking guarra and engaged in some kind of brawl along the road. His neck had been cut in the back and was bleeding. We had a hard time trying to procure his machette. Private Rue had opened up his shirt and we saw the blood. Before we could hardly say a word the native wheeled about on his horse and commenced whipping it vigorously. I thought he was a bandit and wanted to bring him to Pueblo Nuevo. I called to him to halt [ p. 2 ]

but he whipped his horse all the harder. I chased him for about 100 yards and was gaining on him when he suddenly swerved his animal to the left into the bushes. I again yelled to him to halt and struck his animal. The native fell off and rushed back the other way, running very fastly. Private Rue went into the bushes and opened fire on him bringing him down. When we found him his left arm had been badly mangled at the elbow from the shots. At first he bled profusely. We tried to do something for him but he fought us off. He was hostile the entire return trip trying to run away from us and acting pugnacious. The corpsman dressed his wounds and he was then taken away by some other natives.
 
   3.    I reported these contacts to the Commanding Officer here upon my arrival at about 1820. Statements from other members of this patrol will be forwarded upon the Patrol's return to Somoto.
 
          /s/ George H. Bellinger


Pueblo Nuevo
9 p.m. 20 Nov 1927

Capt. R. W. Peard

Dear Sir,

     Bellinger came in with his patrol bringing a native all shot up. The chief of police said he knew the fellow & said his name was Bicisitasion Gonzalez [Visitación González], a good hombre but that he was drunk. I think he was drunk when Belllinger shot him & had probably had a fight previously as Bellinger said he was all bloody. B. was all keyed up & I had to take some time to get the details from him, hence the delay in the detailed telegraphic report. I have just now been able to get him to sit down and make out his written report as I wanted it to get off with McDonald tomorrow. Dunford patched the native up the best he could but said it was hopeless. He was shot in the side & left arm in addition to a machete cut on the back of his head. Jose says he thinks the fellow will live but I don't see how he can. Jose (native guide) also says the reason the president of the elections did not show up at Potrerillos was that the police from Esteli had threatened him. I am having Jose write you a letter telling you about it as I can get only about one fourth of what he says. I am also sending Gy. Sgt. Gordons report to you with a statement from some natives at Potrerillos attached. You said in your telegram to send reports direct to Brig. Commander but I thot [thought] you would like to see it them & they will go in just as fast.  I expect Paul from Condega about 10 p.m. tonight. He and Sgt. Shacker will also have reports to send in. [ p. 2 ]

      In your letter you mention sending Cpl. Faulkner and Pvt. Moore to Leon with the bull carts. I received your telegram about Cpl. Faulkner and Pvt. Voit but haven't heard anything before your letter about a Pvt. Moore going in.

     Bellinger is having a hard time with his written report. I just gave him a little Dewars White Label to calm him down but I guess it will have to be typewritten in the morning in order to be coherent.

     Will write more when Paul gets in.

     Respectfully yours,

               /s/  M. A. Richal

127/43A/3


 ESTADOS UNIDOS CUERPO DE MARINES
Destacamento de Marina
Pueblo Nuevo, Nicaragua
20 de noviembre 1927

Desde: Subteniente George H. Bellinger, Infantería de Marina.
Para: El Comandante de Área, Ocotal, Nicaragua.
Asunto: Informe de la Patrulla

     1. Dejé Somoto con una patrulla de cinco hombres y un animal de carga cerca de las 0900, Domingo, 20 de noviembre de 1927, camino a Pueblo Nuevo. Alrededor de dos leguas de Somoto avistaron una casa situada en una colina cerca de 75 yardas a la derecha de la carretera. Dos hombres estaban sentados en la esquina derecha de la parte delantera de la casa conversando. Me llamó la atención a sus acciones sospechosas que me hizo ordenarles a ellos bajaran hasta la carretera. Uno de los hombres pasó algo al otro y luego vino abajo. El otro fue a la puerta de la casa y entregó algo a la mujer en el interior. Tuve que llamar fuertemente dos o tres veces a ese hombre antes de que finalmente llegara. El raso Rue Arthur W. y el raso Howard C. Joyner me acompañaron a registrar la casa, mientras que los otros marines mantuvieron los hombres en el camino. Se realizaron búsquedas en la casa y encontramos tres machetes tipo de guerra y otro machete de trabajo. Envié al raso Rue a buscar en la parte de atrás de la casa y encontró dos pistolas calibre 38 ocultoa en la maleza cerca de la casa. Estas pistolas tenían cuatro proyectiles en uno de ellos y una concha en la otra. Continuamos nuestra búsqueda en los arbustos y no encontramos nada más. Los brazos de los bandidos fueron adecuadamente y con seguridad atados a la espalda y situé a los bandidos delante de la patrulla bajo el cuidado de sargento Frank B. Patterson y el raso Rue. Los bandidos fueron varias veces advertidos que dejaran de hablar entre sí, y siguieron caminando por delante. Alrededor de una media legua adelante, en una curva del camino, los prisioneros trataron de pronto de ocultarse en la maleza espesa. Oí al Sargento Patterson llamarles para detenerlos pero no le prestaron ninguna atención y por lo tanto Patterson y Rue dispararon contra y los mataron. Pusimos sus cuerpos al lado de la carretera entre los arbustos y continuamos.

     2. Cerca de las 1700 a dos leguas de Pueblo Nuevo fuimos repentinamente sorprendidos por un nativo de cargó sobre nosotros blandiendo un machete de una manera amenazante. Al parecer, había estado recientemente en una pelea, porque tenía sangre sobre el cuello y la pechera de la camisa y mostraba cicatrices frescas en el cuello y la cara. Finalmente nos las arreglamos para detenerlo y quitarle su machete de guerra sin que nadie fuera herido. Al parecer, había estado bebiendo guarra (sic, por guaro) y participado en algún tipo de pelea por el camino. Su cuello había sido cortado en la espalda y estaba sangrando. Tuvimos un rato difícil tratando de procurar su machete. El raso Rue había abierto la camisa y vimos la sangre. Antes de que apenas podíamos decir una palabra el nativo dio vuelta sobre su caballo y comenzó a darle latigazos enérgicamente. Pensé que era un bandido y quería llevarlo a Pueblo Nuevo. Lo llamé para detenerlo [p. 2] pero él pegó su caballo lo más fuerte que pudo. Lo perseguí por cerca de 100 yardas y estaba alcanzándole en él cuando de pronto desvió su animal a la izquierda hacia los arbustos. Otra vez grité a él para detenerle e impactó su animal. El nativo se cayó y se precipitó hacia el otro lado, corriendo muy rápidamente. El raso Rue entró en los arbustos y abrió fuego contra él derribarlo. Cuando lo encontramos su brazo izquierdo había sido destrozado pen el codo de los disparos. Al principio sangró profusamente. Tratamos de hacer algo por él, pero él peleó contra nosotros. Él fue hostil todo el viaje de vuelta tratando de huir de nosotros y actuaba agresivo. El farmacéutico vendó sus heridas y luego se lo llevaron otros nativos.

     3. informé estos contactos al oficial al mando aquí a mi llegada cerca de las 1820. Las declaraciones de otros miembros de esta patrulla serán remitidos a su regreso de la Patrulla de Somoto.

          / s / George H. Bellinger


 

Pueblo Nuevo
9 p.m. 20 de noviembre 1927

Capt. R. W. Peard

Estimado señor,

     Bellinger llegó con su patrulla trayendo a un nativo todos tiro. El jefe de policía dijo que conocía al tipo y dijo que su nombre era Bicisitasion [sic] González [Visitación González], un buen hombre, pero que estaba borracho. Creo que estaba borracho cuando Belllinger le disparó y probablemente había tenido una pelea previamente porque Bellinger dijo que estaba todo ensangrentado. B. estaba todo excitado y tuve que tomarme algún tiempo para obtener los detalles de él, de ahí el retraso en el informe telegráfico detallado. Ahora he sido capaz de conseguir que se sentara y distinguir su informe escrito como yo quería que saliera con McDonald mañana. Dunford remedndó al nativo lo mejor que pudo, pero dijo que no había esperanza. Le dispararon en el brazo izquierdo y lateral, además de un corte de machete en la parte posterior de la cabeza. José dice que cree que el tipo va a vivir, pero no veo cómo puede. José (guía nativo) también dice que la razón por el presidente de las elecciones no se presentó en Potrerillos fue que la policía de Estelí le había amenazado. Estoy haciendo que José escriba una carta informándole al respecto, pero sólo puedo conseguir alrededor de una cuarta parte de lo que dice. También estoy enviando Gy. Sgt. Gordons informes adjuntos a usted con una declaración de algunos indígenas en Potrerillos. Usted dijo en su telegrama pidiendo informes directos a Brig. Comandante pero creo [pensamiento] le gustaría verlos y van a ir con la misma rapidez.
Espero a Paul de Condega cerca de las 10 p.m. esta noche. Él y el sargento Shacker tendrán también informes para enviar en. [P. 2]

      En su carta usted menciona el envío de Cpl. Faulkner y raso Moore a León con las carretas de bueyes. He recibido su telegrama sobre el cabo Faulkner y el raso Voit pero no han escuchado nada antes de su carta sobre un raso Moore ants de entrar.

     Bellinger está teniendo dificultades con su informe escrito. Sólo le di un poco de Dewars etiqueta blanca para calmarlo pero supongo que tendrá que ser escrita a máquina en la mañana con el fin de que sea coherentes.

      Escribirá más cuando Paul llegue.

      Respetuosamente tuyo,

          / s / M. A. Richal

 

RG127/43A/3

Summary & Notes:

   Fascinating & very revealing report.
   Events leading to deaths of the two men:  concrete example of how Marines routinely violated patriarchal norms of rural society, disregarding & violating local cultural precepts of male honor, campesino autonomy, religious beliefs.
   Yelling at the men in a foreign language to issue them orders and demands; two Marines enter a house with a lone woman inside, with men tied up and forced to remain outside their own house; responding to the men's efforts to escape by killing them; unsubstantiated allegation that these men were "bandits"; leaving the men's corpses in the brush along the side of the road instead of seeing to their proper burial.
   Description of the bloody man on the horse exemplary of the zone's continuing political turmoil and violence.
   Report accompanied by letter from 1st Lt. Merton A. Richal to Captain R. W. Peard.
   Less than six weeks later Richal wounded in action
at ZapotillaL (PC28.01.04b-brown) in NE Segovias.

   Unknown whether wounded man on horse lived.

P C - D O C S :      P A T R O L   &   C O M B A T    R E P O R T S
thru 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 +

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

TOP OF PAGE