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PC28.05.30   hatfield

INVENTORY OF PC-DOCS, JANUARY—JUNE 1928

28.01.04 BROWN
28.01.04 BROWN
28.01.04 HUNT
28.01.05 KILCOURSE
28.01.08 SATTERFIELD
28.01.08 WADBROOK
28.01.21 SHAW
28.01.22 PEARD
28.01.31 KENYON
28.02.03 PEARD
28.02.04 MCDONALD
28.02.06 YOUNG
28.02.12 WATERMAN
28.02.18 GEYER
28.02.19 CLARK
28.02.19 GRAY
28.02.21 ORR
28.02.22 SHIEBLER
28.02.23 WELLS
28.02.24 SHIEBLER
28.02.24 ROCKEY
28.02.25 BROWN
28.02.26 CLARK
28.02.26 HOLMES
28.02.26 RIDDERHOF
28.02.27 GEYER
28.02.28 HUNTER
28.02.29 CLAUDE
28.02.29 CRONMILLER
28.03.01 O'DAY
28.03.05 MCNULTY
28.03.05 ROCKEY
28.03.11 AIKEN
28.03.15 CHAPPELL
28.03.16 ARTHUR
28.03.18 RIDDERHOF
28.03.22 ROCKEY
28.03.28 HUNTER
28.03.28 GEYER
28.04.05 ATKINSON
28.04.05 HART
28.04.05 ROBERTS
28.04.05 ROCKEY
28.04.08 HOLMES
28.04.09 PUTNAM
28.04.11 PUTNAM
28.04.11 SNEAD
28.04.15 HATFIELD
28.04.16 STOCKS
28.04.17 AIKEN
28.04.18 GALT
28.04.19 ESAU
28.04.19 MARSHALL
28.04.19 SNEAD
28.04.23 GALT
28.04.23 WILLIS
28.04.23 MCQUEEN
28.04.26 PEFLEY
28.04.28 MCQUEEN
28.04.30 ARNETT
28.05.06 HART
28.05.07 MERRITT
28.05.08 AIKEN
28.05.08 CLARK
28.05.09 KILCOURSE
28.05.11 AIKEN
28.05.11 ESAU
28.05.12 KILCOURSE
28.05.12 PEFLEY
28.05.14 HOLMES
28.05.16 CLAUDE
28.05.16 CRAMER
28.05.17 RIDDERHOF
28.05.17 ADAMS
28.05.18 SCHIEBLER
28.05.20 O'DAY
28.05.21 JENKINS
28.05.21 KENYON
28.05.22 CRAMER
28.05.24 CLAUDE
28.05.24 CRAMER
28.05.25 PIPER
28.05.25 PIPER
28.05.25 UNKNOWN

28.05.30 RAHISER

28.05.30 LINSERT
28.05.30 HATFIELD
28.06.01 SCOTT
28.06.04 HOLMES
28.06.04 O'NEIL
28.06.04 SNEDEKER
28.06.06 YOUNG
28.06.15 BROWN
28.06.16 ANDERSON
28.06.19 BERRY
28.06.20 HUMPHREY
28.06.20 ROCKEY
28.06.24 CRAMER

28.05.30.   Hatfield, Patrol Report to Boaco

P C - D O C S :      P A T R O L   &   C O M B A T    R E P O R T S
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HEADQUARTERS, FIRST BATTALION, FIFTH REGIMENT, SECOND BRIGADE, U.S.M.C.
MANAGUA, NICARAGUA. 30 MAY 1928.

FROM:     Captain Gilbert D. Hatfield, U.S. Marine Corps.
To:       The Commanding General, Second Brigade, U.S. Marines, Managua, Nicaragua.

Subject:  Patrol.

     1.   In obedience to your orders dated 12 May, 1928, a patrol consisting of myself, twelve enlisted marines and one hospital corpsman cleared by truck for Boaco at 0920, 15 May, 1928, and arrived there at 1515 the same date. Had to wait until 1200 the following day in order to obtain the services of a reliable guide. Cleared Boaco on foot at 1415, 14 May.

     2.   Reached my objective, Caño Blanco on north side of the Rio Grande at 0930, 19 May and found all quiet, with no indication that Sandino or any other bandido had ever been in the vicinity. Remained there until 1600, 20 May and then commenced my return journey over name trail. During my stay at this place I sent native runners up and down the river and to Cerro Musun, a tentative second objective. The latter place is some thirty miles from Caño Blanco over almost impassable mountains. Due to the general quietness of the entire section, and the fact that it had been raining for two days, I deemed it inadvisable to attempt the trip there and back, for fear the patrol would get caught in the rainy season proper and have great difficulty in returning to Managua. The only rumor of Sandino was to the effect that he had recently been in the northeastern part of Prinsapolca, but I seriously doubt the truth of this statement. Reached Boaco on return journey at 1600 24 May, and cleared for Managua mounted at 1200 28 May, arrived Tipi Tapa 0400 29 May. Left patrol and mounts there until evening, when they return to Managua.

     3.   The trail traversed was along the Southeastern edge of the mountain range which reaches the Rio Grande about Paigua. The entire route is mountainous, a great part of it through heavy jungle land, which abounds in wild game, foul and snakes. It is sparsely populated, but houses and clearings are numerous enough that chickens, turkeys, tortillers, bananas, native sugar and cheese are always available, and can be purchased at reasonable prices. The natives encountered all seem to be quiet and hard working and very friendly, though most of them had never seen a marine before.

     4.   The total distanced marched was approximately one hundred and fifty miles over high and steep mountains, part of the trail being muddy and slippery, and for two days it rained continuously, yet not one man fell out nor was there a single case of sickness. Ticks were the greatest hardship, but only one man has so far developed the usual ulcer.

     5.   From my experience on this trip I have come to the following conclusions:

[p. 2]

   (a)   That pack animals are indispensable for any patrol of more than three days duration.
   (b)   That dry beans are not desirable as part of the ration, due to the length of time required for their cooking and danger of being burned.
   (c)   That when pack animals are taken, each member of the patrol should be equipped with a hammock, poncho and mosquito net.
   (d)   That the Thompson Sub-Machine Gun with drums and clips is an ideal weapon for patrol work and that each patrol should carry a large proportion of them.
   (e)   That The Browning Automatic Rifle is neither desirable nor necessary with small patrols, because its greater range over the Thompson does not counterbalance its greater weight, and liability of malfunctioning.
   (f)   That one or two specially trained rifle grenadiers should a company each patrol and that a goodly number of both rifle and hand grenades be carried.

     6.   It is requested that Harold S. Chandler, Pharmacist's Mate 3rd Class, U.S. Navy, be commended for his valuable assistance on this patrol. He carried a rifle and ammunition, in addition to his medical outfit, performed guard duty and his share of the work around camp, just as a marine would do, but was always on the alert in his medical duties, of which he is thoroughly conversant, And twice daily put all men through a catechism as to their health. In other words he attempted to, and succeeded in, preventing sickness rather than waiting for it to appear, and I attribute the present excellent physical condition of the members of the patrol, in great part to his efforts in their behalf.


/S/ Gilbert D. Hatfield.
-----------------------------
Copy to:
CO. Fifth Regiment.
Camp Commander, Campo de Marte

RG127/204/3

Summary & Notes:

   A fascinating excursion into the sparsely populated mountainous zone on the north side of the Río Grande north of Boaco, which the evidence suggests was inhabited primarily by indigenous peoples.  An 11-day, 150 mile foot patrol by 13 Marines and one Navy hospital corpsman.

   Authored by the same Captain Gilbert Hatfield who engaged in the polemical back-and-forth with Sandino before the EDSN assault on Ocotal in July 1927.
   This passage from paragraph 3 merits highlighting: "sparsely populated, but houses and clearings are numerous enough that chickens, turkeys, tortillers, bananas, native sugar and cheese are always available, and can be purchased at reasonable prices. The natives encountered all seem to be quiet and hard working and very friendly, though most of them had never seen a marine before."  The social geography in this mountainous zone just north of the Río Grande does not appear to be radically different than the social geography of much of Las Segovias, yet Sandino found no popular support here.  Why not? 
   Thanks to Lebanon Valley College student Nathaniel Clugston for transcribing this report.


P C - D O C S :      P A T R O L   &   C O M B A T    R E P O R T S
thru 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 +

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