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the atlantic coast  •  1929A, p. 3
march 11 - april 22, 1929

A T L A N T I C    C O A S T    D O C S
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   THIS IS THE THIRD PAGE of documents for the FIRST HALF of 1929 on Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast, housing materials dated during the 43 days from March 11 to April 22.

     The potpourri of radiograms, reports & other documents on this page bespeak several larger themes.  One concerns the efforts of the Marines & Guardia to locate the elusive EDSN bands in the sparsely populated zones on the eastern & northern frontiers of Las Segovias, far to the west of the Atlantic Coast region proper.  Another is mounting tensions between the Marine brass and the top officers of the Bragmans Bluff Lumber Company in Puerto Cabezas (especially between Eastern Area Commander Major Utley and the company’s manager, John McKay, who evidently despised Utley).  Yet another concerns ongoing struggles of Miskitu Indians and other Costeños for their rights as citizens.  We can also glean many revealing bits of information, like the release of political prisoner Col. Adán Gómez (16 March), who went on to become a leading member of the EDSN in the East Coast and a close associate of Gen. Pedrón Altamirano, who he was accused of betraying some nine years later, long after the rebellion’s end (see PEDRÓN).  From Major Utley’s description of the tension between himself and Mr. McKay we learn many telling details (16 April), while the letter circulated in Miskitu villages by Miskitu Indian representative Philemon Jackson offers a compelling portrayal of the terrain & discourse of indigenous struggle (22 April). 

     Sandino & the EDSN, these documents strongly suggest, play no substantial role in the region’s ongoing political, economic & social dynamics.


PERIOD MAPS

1894 mosquito shore

27 MB, library of congress

1920s Standard Fruit

6.5 mb, US National archives

1928 Rio wanks Patrol

3 mb, us national archives

1931 Moravian

2.4 mb, comenius press

15 March 1929 (0811).
Radiogram from Gen. Feland, Managua, to Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas.  
"FOLLOWING RADIO FROM MARCORPS QUOTED FOR COMPLIANCE 8614 FOR CAPTAIN MERRITT A EDSON COLON PROCEED NEW ORLEANS LOUISIANA ABOUT APRIL SIX VIA FIRST AVAILABLE CONVEYANCE THENCE BY RAIL NEW YORK NY AND RESUME DUTY WITH MARINE DETACHMENT USS ROCHESTER 1225 NOTIFY THIS OFFICE BY RADIO DATE ----- OF DETACHMENT AND NAME OF VESSELL 0811"

1.   16 March 1929.
The Bluefields Weekly, p. 1.  
"Release of General Naaman Connor. We are glad to know that General Connor has been released after a year's detention as a political prisoner.  Colonel Adan Gómez, who underwent a similar detention, was released at the same time as General Connor."

2.   16 March 1929.
The Bluefields Weekly, p. 2.  
"OUR COMMERCIAL SITUATION.  ¶  From the standpoint of a certain prominent business man of Bluefields, the commercial situation of Bluefields is bad, without immediate prospect of improvement. THe gentleman attributes this condition to two principal causes. He claims that with the promiscuous establishment of commissaries by the exporting banana companies, especially in the Rio Grande Zone, and immense amount of business has been virtually monopolised. He points out how, not so long ago, the Cuyamel Fruit Company's freight barges would leave Bluefields with large cargoes of merchandise, bought from the business houses of Bluefields for the planters and smaller retail concerns of the Rio Grande District -- La Cruz, etc., and how now scarcely any of such merchandise is bought locally, owing as stated before, to the growing number of commissaries at the various farms of the Cuyamel and American Fruit Companies. The second cause, according to this gentleman, is the severe setback that local business has received from the practical closing down of the mahogany works. This trade alone brought to the business of Bluefields about $400,000.00 per annum. Now this income is lost. . . . "

3.   16 March 1929.
The Bluefields Weekly, p. 3.   "OUR COMMERCIAL SITUATION"
[continued & concluded].  

4.   16 March 1929.
The Bluefields Weekly, p. 4.  
"SOBRE EL COMBATIDO 'INTERVENCIONISMO YANKEE', por el Sr. Don Angel R. Ruiz (Periodista Cubano)".  

5.   16 March 1929.
The Bluefields Weekly, p. 5.  
"SOBRE EL COMBATIDO 'INTERVENCIONISMO YANKEE', por el Sr. Don Angel R. Ruiz (Periodista Cubano)" [continued & concluded].    

18 March 1929 (0842).
Radiogram from CO 11th Regiment to Gen. Feland, Managua, copies to COs Eastern Area, Jinotega, Matagalpa.  
"1118 FOLLOWING FROM SAN JUAN DE TELPANECA QUOTE 1117 AGUILINO GOMEZ FORMER SANDINO COURIER AND NOW MY AGENT AT CERRO BLANCO REPORTS DIAZ ESTRADA PERALTA IRIAS AND LOPEZ WITH GROUP OF ABOUT ONE HUNDRED BANDITS CROSSES COCO THIRTEENTH MARCH BOUND FOR EL CEDRO JINOTEGA FOR CONVERENCE WITH ALTAMIRANO BELIEVE RELIABLE 1711 UNQUOTE 0842"

19 March 1929 (1000).
Radiogram from CO Marines Poteca, to Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas.
  "RELIABLE REPORTS THAT RUPERTO HERNANDEZ FORMERLY PRISONER HERE LEFT VICINITY POTECA OVERLAND FOR BOCAY SEVENTEENTH STOP ALSO AMELIA AROSA MOTHER OF HERNANDEZ LEFT BY BOAT SAME DATE AND DESTINATION WITH NATIVE NAMED PALMA STOP 1000"

20 March 1929 (1045).
Radiogram from CO Marines Cuvali to CO Marines La Luz.  
"8620 PETRILLO FIVE MEN AND FIVE MULES ARRIVED ZERO NINE THIRTY STOP PRIVATES GROSSE AND OWENS WITH EIGHT MULES ARRIVED TEN THIRTY RATIONS INTACT 1045"

20 March 1929 (1855).
Radiogram from CO Marines Garrobo to Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas. 
 "8619 YOUR 8618 1930 THE EL CEDRO REFERRED TO IS ONE DAY FROM JINOTEGA ON GUAPINOL JINOTEGA TRAIL AND NOT THE EL CEDRO NEAR GARROBO PERIOD NATIVE AGENT FURNISHED INFORMATION AND IS RELIABLE 1855"

20 March 1929 (1930).
Radiogram from CO Marines Bocay to CO Marines Waspuc. 
 "8619 RUPERTO HERNANDEZ COMA HIS MOTHER COMA AND NATIVE NAMED PALMA HAVE LEFT POTECA AND HEADED FOR BOCAY STOP REQUEST ALL DOPE YOU CAN GIVE ABOUT THEM ESPECIALLY RUPERTO MSG POLLOCK STOP PLEASE GIVE BENSON THE DOPE ON MY FRIEND RUPERTO SIGNED HALL STOP MAYBE YOU CAN DO THE SAME 1930"

26 March 1929.
Boat, property of Bennie Mueller, claim for.  Memo from Lt. J. S. Cook, Supply Dump, at Camp Edson, Waspuc, to Capt. M. A. Edson, Puerto Cabezas. 
 "This office is in receipt of a claim from one Bennie Mueller, for a boat (native) alleged to have been taken by you from Mueller's Bank for the transportation of Marines under your command in July, 1928. Information is requested in the premises."   1st Endorsement by Edson: "The undersigned does not specifically remember the transaction alleged above. However during the month of July 1928, while troops attached to the COCO Patrol were being rushed forward to BOCAY, Nicaragua, all available transportation in the vicinity of WASPUC was commandeered for this move. Mr. Bennie Mueller is known personally by the undersigned and it is believed the claim made above is correct and just. The boat in question is a native boat $50.00 to $75.00. Present location of the boat is not known ... it is recommended that Mr. Mueller be reimbursed in full for his boat. That it be assigned for use by troops in the field between WASPUC and POTECA and that it be resold upon the completion of our activities along the COCO river. It is considered that this action is to be the best interests of the service and economy."

28 March 1929.
The Bluefields Weekly.  
"Mr. Marcus Garvey Seeks Legislative Honours in Jamaica. KINGSTON, Jamaica.—Marcus Garvey, self-styled “Provisional President of Africa” and head of the Universal Negro Improvement Association, has entered politics here and recently announced his candidacy for the Jamaica legislature. He has also begun publication of a newspaper “The Black Man”. ¶ If Garvey is elected and the chances are that he will succeed due to the large number of Negroes in the parish he will have full scope for his powers of oratory in the Colonial Council chambers. ¶ When Mr. Garvey was released from Atlanta prison about two years ago after serving a term for using the mails to defraud, he took a pauper’s oath to avoid paying a large fine which had also been imposed upon him. The condition of his organization in New York would seem to indicate that it is on the verge of bankruptcy, but since his return to Jamaica Mr. Garvey has shown considerable affluence. He has purchased property valued at more than $20,000 and is living in even better style than he lived while in New York. The newspaper which he has established in Jamaica is expected to take the place of The Negro World, edited in new York, which it is reported, will be discontinued in the near future. (NEW YORK AGE) ----------------------------------- ¶ TROPICAL COLOUR ¶ The inhabitants of Monserrat talk English and a visitor from there is responsible for the story of an Irishman who emigrated to that West Indian Island. As he walked down the gangplank, a coloured man stopped him and offered his services as a guide and porter, with a brogue as thick as the Irishman’s own. The son of Erin stopped in amazement and then turned around and walked back up the gangplank to the ship’s deck where an Officer asked him, “What’s the matter? Aren’t you going to land? ¶ “Indade an Oi’m not” replied the Emerald Islander. “Do yez think Oi want to live in a country where the Irishman can get as sunburned as that poor feller?”"

1 April 1929.
Letter from H. O. Allen, Manager, Lumber Department, Bragmans Bluff Lumber Company, Puerto Cabezas, to John McKay, Manager, Bragmans Bluff Lumber Company, Puerto Cabezas. 
 "Dear Sir: ¶ I am sorry to be compelled to call your attention to the very noisy and profane conduct of some of the Marines last night. ¶ My wife, daughter, and myself had retired about nine-thirty o’clock. A little later, we were disturbed by bugles blowing, drums beating, men yelling and swearing. I got up and went out on my porch in time to see how some sixty or seventy marines passing. They were passing bottles from one to another and making a regular bedlam of noise and some were swearing so that they could have been heard from a block around. ¶ I certainly feel, as an American citizen, that instead of these men protecting me and my women folks, that they are insulting me, and that all of President Hoover’s good will tours will avail us nothing so long as the enlisted men and Officers in command of the enlisted men permit them to go out at ten o’clock on a Sabbath night and raise unbridled hell until they exhaust themselves sometime in the morning. ¶ It is certainly a sorry example of our enlightened culture and our respect for human rights, so set before the natives of Nicaragua. ¶ I respectfully suggest that you, as manager of the Nicaragua Division take this matter up with the proper officials. ¶ Yours truly, ¶ (SIGNED) M. O. ALLEN, ¶ Manager, ¶ Lumber Department"

1 April 1929.
Letter from S. R. Ford, Manager, Merchandising Department, Bragmans Bluff Lumber Company, Puerto Cabezas, to John McKay, Manager, Bragmans Bluff Lumber Company, Puerto Cabezas.  
"Dear Sir: ¶ I feel that I should make a protest on the conduct of a mob of American Marines on Sunday night, March 31st, 1929. ¶ After organizing in the marine area with bugles, drums, pans, etc., a crowd of from sixty to a hundred paraded the street on which I live, between ten-thirty and eleven o’clock singing the filthy and vile songs of a soldiers camp; cursing and yelling insults to womanhood in the most obscene manner, and in the hearing of all the American women and children living on the street. This noise was continued far into the night, I do not know how long, as they passed around to other streets. ¶ Although two non-commissioned officers live in the house on one side of house 90, my residence, and a commissioned officer lives in the house on the other side, no attempt was made by their superiors to interfere with their conduct, nor did I see any other officer attempt to control these men. ¶ As an American I feel that steps should be taken to punish the guilty parties, and prevent such things in the future. ¶ S. R. Ford"

2 April 1929.
Letter from L. W. Hitchens, Assistant Manager, Bragmans Bluff Lumber Company, Puerto Cabezas, to John McKay, Manager, Bragmans Bluff Lumber Company, Puerto Cabezas.  
Another complaint against the Marines nighttime carousing on Sun. March 31.

2 April 1929.
Letter from John McKay, Manager, Bragmans Bluff Lumber Company, Puerto Cabezas, to Gen. Feland, Managua, p. 1.  
"Dear Sir: ¶ I am taking the liberty of writing you this letter feeling that you will give it due consideration and such handling as will afford us relief from a distasteful and intolerable situation in Puerto Cabezas. ¶ I have a long while felt that it was sooner or later going to become necessary for me to take such action. I have delayed doing so hoping that things would right themselves as they often do under the softening influence of time. My hopes have not been realized and I fear that they were originally without foundation. ¶ The peace and comfort of a lot of us here has been greatly disturbed at more or less frequent intervals by the conduct of some of the members of the Marine Corps. We had a particularly disagreeable time Easter Sunday March 31st. The safety and comfort of some of our people were endangered by reckless automobile driving by the Commanding Officer of the Marine Corps. The work of loading our steamer was interfered with and delayed by a crowd of Marines. The employees loading the ship were interfered with and endangered by members of the Marine Corps riding up and down the track upon a railroad push car. Families of our officers and employees were offended by loud and profane language used by members of the Marine Corps in our streets in the vicinity of their homes. ¶ I realize quite well that the ordinary course of procedure would be for me to present my request for relief from the intolerable situation to the Commanding Officer here. My reason for not doing so is that the Commanding Officer was himself a party to the affair Sunday and he was present upon the wharf during the turmoil there and was himself guilty of reckless driving in and about the streets. To be brutally frank and to place you in a position to understand the difficulties of the situation confronting us here, I will state that the Commanding Officer is, in my disinterested opinion, responsible for the greater portion, if not all, of the difficulties of which I have occasion to complain . . . "

2 April 1929.
Letter from John McKay, Manager, Bragmans Bluff Lumber Company, Puerto Cabezas, to Gen. Feland, Managua, p. 2.  
" . . . Sunday afternoon I had a riding party of eight leave my home at about 4:30 p.m. The party consisted of four ladies and four men including myself. The Commanding Officer waited at my house until the party started then drove his car behind and amongst and through the party repeatedly, in a very erratic manner following the party several blocks, circling around and requesting the splitting up of the party. His reasons for his conduct are entirely unknown to me but they were highly objectionable and in my opinion dangerous. ¶ I attach a copy of a report made to me by the Assistant Manager of the Division in reply to my inquiry regarding the delay in loading our weekly steamer Sunday night. The Commanding Officer, I am informed, was present on the wharf and on the steamer while this was going on. ¶ I attach a copy of a report made to me by the Manager of the Lumber Department concerning the boisterous conduct of some Marines in front of or in the vicinity of his residence. ¶ I attach a copy of a report made to me by Mr. Ford a member of our Merchandise Department Staff, regarding the boisterous actions of a number of Marines in our streets at a late hour of the night. ¶ If further statements are necessary, I am in position to furnish them. ¶ I feel that this condition is a reflection upon the United States Marine Corps. I dislike very much to see it. I dislike very much to have to record these happenings. I think, however, that they should be stopped, and I have great faith that you will cause such action to be taken as will stop further happenings of this kind. ¶ Yours respectfully ¶ BRAGMANS BLUFF LUMBER COMPANY ¶ BY ¶ Jnc. McKay ¶ Manager"

3 April 1929 (1601).
Radiogram from Marcorps to Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas.  
Re supplies, fruits & vegetables & steamer schedules.

4 April 1929 (1415).
Radiogram from CO Marines Las Carpas to Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas. 
 "FOLLOWING RECEIVED VIA NATIVE RUNNER FROM BIJAGUA ARRIBA SIGNED FOX QUOTE 8628 FOX AND TWENTY THREE DELIVERED SEVEN MULES OF TEN TO CUNNINGHAM AND SEVENTEEN AT BOCACITO TODAY STOP COMBINED PATROL ARRIVED GARROBO EIGHTEEN TWENTY FIVE FOX RECEIVED BRIGADE SECRET ORDERS NUMBER ONE AND YOUR 8625 2130 AND WILL COMPLY BUT PROBABLY ONE DAY LATE STOP AREA NORMAL ALONG TRAIL BIJAGUA ARRIBA DASH OVER PENA BLANCA RANGE DASH BOCACITO DASH GARROBO STOP GARROBO CANNOT FURNISH TEN DAYS RATIONS FOR BOTH PATROLS STOP CUNNINGHAM CLOSES RADIO ELEVEN HUNDRED TWENTY NINTH AND MOVES TO LA PITA IN ACCORDANCE WITH BRIGADE SECRET ORDER NUMBER ONE 2325 UNQUOTE 1415"   What is "Brigade Secret Order No. 1"??

5 April 1929 (1500).
Radiogram from CO Aviation Managua to Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas.  
"8605 FOLLOWING PICKUP MADE AT POTECA QUOTE RADIO OUT OF COMMISSION ON ACCOUNT OF LACK OF BAKER BATTERIES STOP EXPECT BAKER BATTERIES ON BOAT SEVENTH OR EIGHTH STOP ALSO NEED FIVE COMMA ONE SEVEN ONE AFFIRM TUBES AND TWO VICE TARE FIVE TUBES AND TWENTY FOUR AFFIRM BATTERIES STOP CAN RECEIVE IF STATIONS WILL BROADCAST ON SCHEDULE SIGNED BURKS UNQUOTE STOP THREE HUNDRED POUNDS POST EXCHANGE SUPPLIES DROPPED AT LAS CARPAS STOP LAS CARPAS BIJAGUA LIET CUNNINGHAM AND POTECA HAVE NOTHING TO REPORT 1500"

5 April 1929.
Statement of First Lt. Edwin A. Pollock, U.S.M.C.  
"On the afternoon of March 31, 1929, at about four o'clock I was riding in a car with Major Utley and Mr. Harry Fenlason. We passed a party on horseback, composed of officers, civilians and ladies, the apparent leader was Mr. John McKay, the Manager of the Bragmans Bluff Lumber Company. After passing the party the second time Major Utley stopped his car to allow the entire party to pass. Mr. McKay, who was some distance ahead of the car, stopped, turned his horse and came to the car and as near as I remember made the following remarks in a very sarcastic manner; "I am very sorry Major Utley that you were not invited on the party but I am sure another one can be arranged in the near future. I asked Mrs. Utley twice." Major Utley's reply was that he had been given to understand that [he] was not invited but that Mrs. Utley had been invited. I had been with Major Utley from eleven thirty that morning until the time of the above incident and to the best of my knowledge and belief he was positively not drunk."

6 April 1929.
Letter from Capt. R. W. Peard, Bluefields, to My Dear Colonel [G-2], Managua, p. 1.  
Cover letter for handbill in Bluefields, below.

6 April 1929.
Letter from Capt. R. W. Peard, Bluefields, to My Dear Colonel [G-2], Managua, p. 2. 
Handbill: "ESPELUZNANTE SITUACION DE BLUEFIELDS - EL JUEZ DE DISTRITO ROMERO, COMETE ACTOS INMORALES EN PRESENCIA DE UNA NIÑITA DE 10 AÑOS."

9 April 1929 (1833).
Radiogram from Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas to Commander Southern Sector Bluefields.  
"8609 FOLLOWING FROM CAPT HOLMES QUOTE A BOY NAMED MARCUS SPENT NIGHT OF MARCH TWENTY EIGHT IN GUIGUILI SAID HE RAN AWAY FROM PEDRON ALTAMIRANO GROUP DURING EDSONS CONTACT BECAUSE HE DID NOT WANT TO LEAVE OCONGUAS DISTRICT INDEFINITELY SAID PEDRON WAS BOUND FOR ATLANTIC COAST BY WAY OF RIO GRANDE COMMA MEANING THE RIO GRANDE FLOWING SOUTHEAST FROM MATAGALPA PROVINCE UNQUOTE 1833"

10 April 1929 (0840).
Radiogram from Capt. Burks, CO Marines Poteca, to Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas.  
"8610 REQUEST PERMISSION TO LEAVE POTECA MORNING OF ELEVENTH WITH ABOUT TWO SQUADS FOR PATROL TO LA FLORS VIA GUIGUILI AND BOCA DE CUA LEAVING GY SGT STAFFORD IN CHARGE FOR ABOUT TEN DAYS STOP BURKS 0840"

10 April 1929 (0942).
Radiogram from Gen. Feland, Managua, to Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas. 
 "8610 SUBMIT WITHOUT DELAY DATA IN REFERENCE TO AMERICAN AND FOREIGN PROPERTY INTERESTS INCLUDING NAMES COMMA LOCATIONS COMMA APPROXIMATE VALUE AND NATURE OF PROPERTY 0942"

10 April 1929 (1220).
Radiogram from Capt. R. W. Peard, CO Southern Sector, Bluefields, to Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas.  
"8610 PLEASE PROCURE NAMES AND NUMBERS OF THREE GN DESERTERS AT LA LUZ AND ADVISE URGENTLY REQUEST THESE DESERTERS BE HELD UNDER ARREST UNTIL YOU HAVE OPPORTUNITY TO SEND THEM TO EAST COAST UNDER GUARD WE HAVE BEEN HAVING EPIDEMIC OF DESERTION RECENTLY AND WISH TO MAKE EXAMPE OF THESE MEN EVERY PRIVATE GREYTOWN DESERTED NIGTH OF APRIL SEVENTH LEAVING ONLY ONE SGT THERE PEARD 1220"

12 April 1929 (0630).
Radiogram from CO Marines Neptune to Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas. 
 "FOLLOWING REPORT FROM COMMANDANTE OF LAMON STOP THREE NATIVES IN GUARDIA UNIFORMS COMMA ARMED WITH ONE RIFLE TWO PISTOLS COMMA DEPARTED FROM HIS HOUSE YESTERDAY AT TEN HUNDRED STOP THEY ASKED FOR PISPIS TRAIL BUT TOOK TRAIL TOWARD BOCAY STOP FOUR IN PARTY NOW ONE GUIDE SECURED AT LAMON STOP ONE MARINE PATROL ONE PIS PIS TRAIL ANOTHER AT SAN PEDRO STOP 0630"

14 April 1929 (2000).
Radiogram from Capt. R. W. Peard, CO Southern Sector Bluefields, to Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas.  
"8613 FOLLOWING FROM SECBRIG FROM JEFE DIRECTOR GUARDIA QUOTE AQIR REPORT APRIL TENTH SAW TEN BOATS ON RIO GRANDE RIVER GOING DOWN STREAM TOWARDS LARGARTO COLORADO IN MILITARY FORMATION STOP MEN WORE KHAKI AND FELT HATS STOP BELIEVED TO BE BANDIT GROUP UNQUOTE REQUEST ALL PLANES TOMORROW TO BLUEFIELDS TO TAKE SELF AND AS MANY MEN AS CAN BE CARRIED IN THREE ROUND TRIPS TO EL GALLO FOR RIVER PATROL 2000"

15 April 1929 (1055).
Radiogram from Gen. Feland, Managua, to Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas.  
"8615 EL GALLO REPORTS NATIVE FROM UPPER RIO GRANDE RIVER REPORTS ALTAMIRANO WITH TWO HUNDRED MEN AT CREEK NEAR TUMA RIVER HEADING TOWARDS RIO GRANDE STOP CAPTAIN ROSE AND PATROL WILL CLEAR EL GALLO THE SIXTEENTH TO INVESTIGATE STOP PLEASE ADVISE REGARDING MOVEMENTS OF FIFTH REGIMENT OR GUARDIA PATROLS IN EASTERN MATAGALPA 1055"

16 April 1929.
Excerpt from report of Brigade Inspector, Puerto Cabezas.   "The Bragmans Bluff Lumber Company has a concession from the Nicaraguan Government covering the territory in the vicinity of Puerto Cabezas. Their operations consist in raising and shipping bananas to the extent of about twenty-yeight or thirty thousand stemps weekly, and cutting, milling and shipping pine lumber, representing an investment of about twelve million dollars. The money and other valuable property located in Puerto Cabezas would be most tempting to bandits but it is situation a great distance from the present bandit activities."
Source: USNA/RG127/E38/Box 18

1.   16 April 1929.
Memorandum for Major Larson, GN2 Intelligence, Managua, from Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas, p. 1.

2.   16 April 1929.
Memorandum for Major Larson, GN2 Intelligence, Managua, from Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas, p. 1.

3.   16 April 1929.
Memorandum for Major Larson, GN2 Intelligence, Managua, from Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas, p. 1.

4.   16 April 1929.
Memorandum for Major Larson, GN2 Intelligence, Managua, from Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas, p. 1.

5.   16 April 1929.
Memorandum for Major Larson, GN2 Intelligence, Managua, from Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas, p. 1.

20 April 1929.
The Bluefields Weekly.   "OUTRAGE BY GUARDIA - Are Homes in Nicaragua to be denied inviolable Sanctity?  Brutal treatment of young lady by Guardia Nacional."  
"On Thursday night, the 18th inst., at about 9:20 pm while Dr. Octavio Salinas, Consular representative for Sweden in this town, was absent from his home on Avenida Reyes, Major Peard along with some National Guardsmen, entered the Doctor’s home and arrested Senorita Hilda Morazan who was there at the time. We do not know the motive for the arrest. The Doctor’s wife, Dona Panchita Morazan de Salinas, who is a sister of Señorita Morazan, and who was at home at the time, protested to the Officers of the Law that they were acting contrary to the Constitution of Nicaragua in making this arrest and in violating the sanctity of her home. For her remonstrance, she was rudely handled and pushed aside. ¶ Señor Gilberto Lacayo, our Jefe Politico, who was present at the time remonstrated vigorously with the Major, pointing out to him that he and his men were acting contrary to the laws and Constitution of the country. The Major thereupon gave orders for more drastic action, ignoring the protests of the Jefe Politico. ¶ While the guardsmen were on their way to the jail with their fair prisoner, hustling her along, the Jefe Politico overtook them, and ordered them to desist from their brutal treatment, but they would not heed him. ¶ On returning to the Doctor’s home the Jefe Politico was requested by Major Peard to view the occurrence leniently, but the Jefe Politico replied in strong terms that the matte would not be hushed up. ¶ The young lady who suffered the gross insult was released and sent home the same night. ¶ A protest has been sent by several inhabitants, both Spaniards and Creole, to be forwarded to the President, requesting the immediate removal of the present head of the National Guard here. ¶ Jefe Politico entitled to respectful treatment ¶ The President of Nicaragua is the head of the National Guard. The Jefe Politico, as the highest civil authority in Bluefields, and as the personal representative of the President here, is certainly entitled to more respectful treatment than that which was given him on last Thursday by the Guardia Nacional. ¶ THE BLUEFIELDS WEEKLY commends Senor Gilberto Lacayo for his prompt action. If Thursday night’s incident went unrebuked a precedent would be created which would render unsafe the privacy and honour of our homes. What happened then could easily be duplicated on pretexts which have no semblance of a claim to justice. ¶ The Nicaraguans who gave their lives for the cause of freedom, died not only for political liberty. They died to secure and assure honour and security for our homes, and respectful and chivalrous treatment for our wives, our daughters, and our sisters."

20 April 1929 (1625).
Radiogram from CO Marines Cuvali to Major H. H. Utley, Puerto Cabezas. 
 "8619 FOLLOWING FROM GARROBO VIA RUNNER QUOTE 8618 CLEARED GARROBO AT SEVEN HUNDRED STOP ARRIVED GOLONDRINO FOURTEEN THIRTY AND MET NATIVE RUNNER FROM CUVALI THERE STOP WILL CLEAR FOR GARROBO AND WILL ARRIVE THERE THE EIGHTEENTH ABOUT NOON STOP REQURE AXE AND BAKER BATTERIES FOR RADIO AT GARROBO STOP CUNNINGHAM 1625"

1.   20 April 1929.
Report of Informal Investigation at Puerto Cabezas, Second Brigade Inspector Henry L. Larsen, Managua, to General Feland, Managua, p. 1. 
 With 5 enclosures:  (A) Letter of Mr. McKay, dated 2 April, 1929. (B) Statement of Mr. L. W. Hitchins, dated 2 April, 1929. (C) Statement of Mr. H. O. Allen, dated 1 April, 1929. (D) Statement of Mr. S. R. Ford, dated 1 April, 1929. (E) Letter of Brigade Inspector, to Major H. H. Utley, U.S. Marine Corps, dated 15 April, 1929. (F) Reply of Major H. H. Utley, dated 16 April, 1929."   SUMMARY:  Makes Utley out to be a rude & reckless drunkard & something of a menace and recommends his removal from Puerto Cabezas.

2.   20 April 1929.
Report of Informal Investigation at Puerto Cabezas, Second Brigade Inspector Henry L. Larsen, Managua, to General Feland, Managua, p. 2.  

3.   20 April 1929.
Report of Informal Investigation at Puerto Cabezas, Second Brigade Inspector Henry L. Larsen, Managua, to General Feland, Managua, p. 3. 

22 April 1929.
"Copy of letter sent by Philemon Jackson to many of the Mosquito Indian villages.  Copy handed to Mr London by the Minister for Foreign Affairs, June 20, 1929"  (Enclosure No. 2 in Mr. London's despatch No. 56 of June 21, 1929), p. 1.

22 April 1929.
"Copy of letter sent by Philemon Jackson to many of the Mosquito Indian villages.  Copy handed to Mr London by the Minister for Foreign Affairs, June 20, 1929"  (Enclosure No. 2 in Mr. London's despatch No. 56 of June 21, 1929), p. 2.

 

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11

12

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