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the atlantic coast  •  1932A, p. 3
April 1932

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   THIS IS THE THIRD PAGE of documents for the FIRST HALF of 1932 on Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast region, housing documents dated during the month of April.

     The big event on the Coast during the month is the April 4 Guardia mutiny at the recently established post at Kisalaya, resulting in the death of Guardia 1st Lt. Charles J. Levonski — a mutiny described in considerable detail in Col. Leech’s report of 9 April — to which is appended several revealing eyewitness testimonies — and in the court martial proceedings of 11 April.  Historians Neill Macaulay & Volker Wünderich interpret the Kisalaya mutiny as an act of vengeance by Miskitu Indians & the EDSN against the Guardia’s killing of Adolfo Cockburn the previous October (Macaulay, The Sandino Affair (Duke, 1985), pp. 223-25, and Wünderich, Sandino en la Costa (Managua, 1989), p. 124 ff.).  Others disagree — most notably David C. Brooks in his unpublished Ph.D. dissertation (“Revolution from Without,” U-Conn Storrs, 1997, chap. 10).  Readers will judge for themselves, but my own interpretation accords with Brooks’ — I see nothing here to suggest that the mutiny was inspired by a desire to avenge Cockburn’s death, and much to indicate that it originated in a grudge against Levonski on the part of its four leaders, especially Sgt. Sebastian Jiménez; that it erupted mainly as a result of Levonski’s efforts to discipline his troops, combined with excessive beer drinking among the mutineers & their shared sense that Levonski had disrespected them in various ways; and that it had nothing to do with avenging Cockburn.

     Seventeen days after the mutiny, on April 21, Kisalaya is attacked by a group of some 50 Sandinistas, accompanied by an unknown number of civilians, as described in Lt. Francisco Gaitan’s report the following day.  Repelling the assailants after an hour’s exchange of gunfire, the Guardia finds among the three dead none other than Sgt. Jiménez, who after the mutiny had joined the rebels & convinced them that taking the garrison would be easy.  Gaitan’s reports are always worth reading, as much for their literary qualities as their depth of detail, which is no less true of his previous week’s account of his patrol’s failed search for the mutineers, undertaken with the active assistance of local Miskitu (April 17).

     Toward the end of the month, on April 28, Sandino writes to Gen. Francisco Estrada announcing yet another expedition to the Coast, to be undertaken by Estrada & Gen. Pedro Antonio Irías — and telling him that, if they do end up establishing “el Control de ese Litoral,” that he (Estrada) will be named the Coast’s Gobernador Intendente.  Clearly Sandino hopes that the coming offensive will succeed where others have failed in defeating the Guardia, booting out the Americans, and extending his rebel republic from Las Segovias eastward to embrace the cities & ports & foreign properties of the Coast.

PERIOD MAPS

1894 mosquito shore

27 MB, library of congress

1920s Standard Fruit

6.5 mb, US National archives

1928 Rio wanks Patrol

3 mb, us national archives

1931 Moravian

2.4 mb, comenius press

1 April 1932.
Extracts from GN-2 Report Covering the Month of March 1932.   
[NOTE:  These excerpts constitute the sum total of text devoted to the Atlantic Coast region in this 25-page intelligence report covering the entire country, except Lt. Curcey’s intelligence report of 20 January from Wauni, which is included in chronological sequence in these East Coast pages. The image to the left is the report's cover page only.]

" [p. 1]   LOCATION OF THE ENEMY ELEMENTS.  ¶  . . .   [p. 4]   H. PEDRON ALTAMIRANO.  ¶  . . . March 27 – Reported moving around the north of the Tuma River (Peña Blanca) possibly preparing for a movement to Neptune Mine or south into Chontales.  [NOTE:  Of the 18 jefes surveyed in this section, none were reported active in the Eastern Area.]  ¶  . . .   [p. 5]   UNITS IN CONTACT[NOTE:  Of the ten contacts listed for February, none were in the Eastern Area.]  ¶  . . .   [p. 7]   STRENGTH AND MOVEMENTS.  [NOTE:  Of the 23 items in this category, none concern the Eastern Area.]  ¶ . . .   [p. 10]   SUMMARY OF COMBAT INTELLIGENCE TO INCLUDE 7 MARCH 1932.  ¶  . . .   [p. 11]   EASTERN AREA:  The bandits in this area have moved into Bocay region. They are short of ammunition. Abraham Rivera, personal representative of Sandino with the bandits operating on east coast, is reported to have gone west of Bocay for conference with Sandino. Probably to arrange to get ammunition and for another raid into the Department of Northern Bluefields. Weather has been fine in Northern Bluefields for past two weeks and the trails rapidly drying up.  Another raid is fully expected toward the end of March or first of April.  It may be remembered that in the correspondence captured from Irias in Lt. Gray’s contact, 4 February, that he mentioned in a letter to Sandino, the advisability of waiting until in March when the country was dry, to renew operations and burn every house on the railroad.  ¶  . . .   [p. 12]   SUMMARY OF COMBAT INTELLIGENCE TO INCLUDE 14 MARCH 1932.  ¶  . . . On the East Coast it is expected that a movement will be attempted within the next ten days to two weeks.  ¶  . . .   [p. 13]   SUMMARY OF COMBAT INTELLIGENCE TO INCLUDE MONDAY 21 MARCH 1932.  ¶  . . . BANDIT MOVEMENTS.  ¶  . . . The Eastern Area reported generally quiet during the past week. . . . Latest report form a reliable source was to the effect that a group between 300 and 400 with at least 200 rifles 100 of which were new and some men carrying new bandoleers of ammunition were moving in the direction of TRONCA about the 18th.  This group were driving 35 head of cattle.  Same agent reported that another group was said to be in TRONCA.  TRONCA is on the main trail from Jinotega to Wauni and Neptune Mine.  ¶  . . .   [p. 14]   ESTIMATE.  ¶  . . . The bandits reported en route to, and at TRONCA indicates that we may expect to hear from Pedron soon.  Three possible objectives are indicated for this group – Wauni and Neptune Mines, La Cruz del Rio Grande, and Chontales.  The probabilities that the direction of the movement will be toward the mines or La Cruz del Rio Grande, seem about even. If Chontales in the objective, they evidently intend to pass well to the East since they have beef on the hoof with them. . . .  ¶   [p. 15]   SUMMARY OF COMBAT INTELLIGENCE TO INCLUDE MONDAY 28 MARCH 1932.  [NOTE:  Nothing on the Eastern Area.]  ¶  . . .   [p. 25]   CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONTACTS OF THE GUARDIA NACTIONAL DE NICARAGUA FOR THE MONTH OF MARCH 1932[NOTE:  Of the 10 contacts listed, none were in the Eastern Area.]"

1.     1 April 1932.
Monthly Record of Events for the Department of Southern Bluefields for the Month of March 1932, Capt. Ralph McAfee, Bluefields, p. 1.

2.     1 April 1932.
Monthly Record of Events for the Department of Southern Bluefields for the Month of March 1932, Capt. Ralph McAfee, Bluefields, p. 2.

3.     1 April 1932.
Monthly Record of Events for the Department of Southern Bluefields for the Month of March 1932, CCapt. Ralph McAfee, Bluefields, p. 3.

7 April 1932.
Letter from Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, to Gen. C. B. Matthews, Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 1. 
 My dear General:-  ¶  I am anxiously awaiting Inman’s report on the causes and events of the recent happenings at Kisalaya.  I cannot understand it in view of reports that since Levonski had relieved Suprenant there, a marked change for the better was apparent and that this entire outfit appeared happier and more content.  A letter from Inman Saturday again mentioned these facts.  ¶  The occurrence was a blow to us all, and Levonski’s loss greatly felt. He was a good officer, and always seemed to have the good will and liking of his men.  The loss of arms and ammunition will probably be heavy, and certainly will be costly to us in more ways than one.  If the mutineers succeed in joining up with the bandits on the upper Wanks with all those arms, automatics and ammunition that were at Kisalaya, it will give them just what they have been short of and we can certainly expect trouble.  I am just hoping the planes can locate them, and be lucky with a few bombs. It was sure a tough break and the suddenness of it certainly a blow in my confidence to the Guardia in this Area.  ¶  I had directed Inman to send a patrol from there toward Toob Roas and from Moss Farm toward the same objective and one from Kipla Farm to Skitko on the Rio Bambana, all to leave Tuesday morning for the purpose of learning the trails and scouring the country West of the Railroad as counter propaganda against any anticipated movement of the bandits from up the river.  A patrol from Neptune is scouring the territory East of the mine and one from Wauni left Neptune to return to Wauni on the 31st.  By these patrols I had hoped to create the . . . "

7 April 1932.
Letter from Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, to Gen. C. B. Matthews, Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 2. 
 " . . . impression on the bandit leaders that we were more than ready for them, and had taken the offensive against them.  Of course the mutiny at Kisalaya, cancelled these orders.  It is probable that the orders for the patrol from Kisalaya precipitated the occurrence there, for it would have been a hard patrol . ¶  I am going up there by the next planes for a few days to look into conditions and try to find out how far this mutinous spirit has permeated Inmans command.  I have confidence in him but there must be something back of the occurrence.  I would be there now but I hated to have the planes lose any opportunity to make contact with the mutineers.  ¶  Under separate cover I have written you something of conditions in Bluefields.  It strikes me that the bank officials are not playing the game fairly and are responsible for the actions of their agents acting in an official capacity.  I know your policy against mixing up in anything outside of the guardia, yet I felt I had to explain the situation to you.  ¶  I wish I had sufficient extra men, equipment and transport to send a sixty man, four officer patrol up the Coco River after the mutineers, equipped to stay put until their mission was accomplished, but I can’t do it.  It would take careful planning and be a terrific undertaking, and the transport problem almost impossible of solution.  I have initiated a recruiting campaign both here and in Puerto Cabezas to bring the 9th Company up to strength again.  It is going to be difficult to get the old timers to reenlist or extend from now on, for they are frank to say they do not care to be in the guardia after the Americans leave, so our difficulties increase instead of decreasing.  The morale of the Guardia here is high.  ¶  I hope you are not having too many worries and troubles on that side now, and that I can stop sending you disquieting news.  ¶  With best personal regards, I am,  ¶  Cordially,  ¶  L. L. LEECH"

7 April 1932.
Conditions in Bluefields.  Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, to Gen. C. B. Matthews, Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 1.  
"1. The recent defalcation of bank funds by the book keeper, Eustace M. Campbell, and the actions of the bank authorities re settlement of accounts submitted by individuals has brought about a situation in which there are potentialities of trouble here.  ¶  2. Many of the Creoles (about seventy in number), had accounts in the bank and the bookkeeper himself a Creole and trusted by the people handled most of these accounts, often taking in and receipting for deposits.  These peopled acted in good faith and have presented their bank books and deposit slips many times and have been refused settlement.  The bank officials and the auditor claim that each deposit slip and bank book should be been initialed by two bank officials, but no notice of such a requirement was ever posted in the bank or published in the local papers and the public consequently knew nothing of it until after the defalcation became known, and then not until individuals presented their books and deposit slips for withdrawals.  It seems to be the policy of the bank not to make any more restitution than it possibly can, letting the individual depositors take the loss.  The bank savings of these people mean a lot to them, and as children would trust, so they trusted the bank officials.  Therein lies the source of potential trouble.  ¶  3. The Creole element and depositors seem to be the only ones destined to lose their money and naturally they are very indignant and excited, and can be easily aroused.  We have done our best to keep them quiet and peacefully to prevent them getting together in a mass meeting.  I have had their leaders in for a conference and they assure me they will try to get justice in a peaceful and legal way, but they can’t sit back and see the Government rob them.  One leader came to me this morning and stated that an element had started the rumor that the only way to get their money back was to “Take” the bank.  He also stated the leaders of the Creoles were preaching patience, and telling them that justice would be done, but he was afraid that unless the bank and officials changed their . . . "

7 April 1932.
Conditions in Bluefields.  Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, to Gen. C. B. Matthews, Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 2.  
" . . . policy and were just, he was afraid the Creole element might become aroused to such an extent that trouble would result.  It is this Creole element of the population to whom we look for aid in case of serious trouble; most of our Guardia, and practically all our civicoes being Creoles.  ¶  4. There may be a few of the claims that need thorough investigation, but from all I have been able to gather, the great majority of them are just, and deposits were made in good faith.  For that reason, and more specifically in the interest of law and order, I recommend that, if you can in any way bring pressure to bear on the Bank Officials there, for a more lenient and generous attitude towards the claims against the bank here, it would have a most calming effect on the Creole element here, moreover, if in some way if might become known the Guardia had brought such a change about, the confidence of the people in the Guardia would be greatly increased, with a consequent beneficial effect on morale.  ¶ L. L. LEECH"

1.     9 April 1932.
Report on Recent Occurrences at Kisalaya.  Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 1.  
"1. On Monday, April 4, 1932, the Kisalaya Guardia were engaged in extracting logs which were to be used in the construction of a new barracks.  From statements of Lieut. Reyes, reference (a), it appears there had been discontent in the command preceding that date, also that Sergeant Sebastian Jimenez, #3427, had been drinking beer that day and had become insubordinate, refusing to obey the orders of Lieut. Levonski, and precipitated the mutiny, which apparently had been contemplated for some time, by appearing with a sub-Thompson machine gun, and on signal nearly all the command seized their arms, went to their defense stations, in a series of entrenchments all around the cuartel and opened fire in all directions.  In the meantime, Lieut. Levonski, after attempting peaceably to avert trouble, started for the barbette of the Heavy Browning Machine Gun and was shot by Sergeant Jimenez, who after he realized Lieut. Levonski was not firing back, went in and fired approximately thirty rounds into his body.  Lieut. Levonski was apparently badly hurt, if not killed at the first shot.  Lieut. Reyes was wounded and his statement of the details afterward had been checked against that of reference (b) and seems to be correct.  The Guardia who escaped to Cabo Gracias will arrive here tonight and will be questioned later.  ¶  2. Reference (b) is a clear statement of what occurred after Lieut. Levonski was killed, picturing the wild orgy and excitement.  Lieut. Levonski was killed about 1430, and the hospital corpsman, Cabo Jose Tercero, one of the Loyal Guardia, who had escaped, arrived at Louisiana Farm, hysterical and half crazy, about 2300, Tuesday, April 6, 1932.  From there he called Lieut. Suprenant at Moss Farm, who promptly went to see and talk to him. Lieut. Suprenant states that man was crazy but did report the shooting-up of the Kisalaya post by the Guardia.  Lieut. Suprenant, thinking that the man crazy took him to the cuartel at Moss Farm and placed him in his own room and thought he had gone to sleep.  About 0130, an hour after his arrival, he jumped out the back door, without stairs, of the cuartel and disappeared and hasn’t been seen since.  ¶  Lieutenant Suprenant then secretly relayed the information to Captain Inman, who directed him to seek Lieut. Peterson’s patrol at Caya Tigne and verify that Lieut. Reyes’ patrol had not arrived.  Lieut. Suprenant returned to Louisiana at 0655 and telephone Captain . . . "

2.     9 April 1932.
Report on Recent Occurrences at Kisalaya.  Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 2.  
" . . . Inman that the Kisalaya patrol had not arrived.  ¶  3. Upon receipt of this information, Captain Inman hurriedly took off for Kisalaya by plane and on arrival there about 0900 found the place deserted, the cuartel a shambles and completely stripped of everything except cots, and the wrecked radio outfit.  Reference (C) is a statement of the property and funds on hand in the cuartel at the time the mutiny occurred.  Practically nothing has been recovered.  All ammunition, grenades, automatic weapons, and an unknown quantity of Krag rifles as well as all the property had been removed.  All the papers and records were torn up and scattered over the place.  ¶  4. Upon seeing the place deserted, the planes saw signaling from down the river, and on investigating discovered Lieut. Reyes, and evacuated him to Port, learning from him what had happened, they returned in the afternoon, patrolled nearly to the Waspook seeking the escaping mutineers, and though they saw suspicious signs, yet no people.  On their return trip the remains of Lieut. Levonski were evacuated to Port, and buried about 1530 April 8, 1932.  ¶  5. Reference (b) is a statement of an eye witness of the events after the shooting up of the cuartel. Reference (e) is a roster of the Guardia at Kisalaya at the time of the occurrence.  It shows also, those who mutinied, those who remained loyal and whereabouts known, and those still missing.  ¶  6. The last information of the mutineers received was from the Indians on the river who stated they had crossed into Honduras, left their boats on the river bank at Pranza, and headed north, having secured a few pack animals, exact number unknown.  ¶  7. Captain Inman states he and the plane personnel had lunch in Kisalaya on Monday, April 4, 1932 and had left there about 1300 arriving in Port about 1400.  While they were there, everything seemed to be all right through he noticed Sergeant Jimenez appeared glum.  At the time they were there, the automatics were in the officers’ quarters where they habitually kept except when on patrol.  The Heavy Browning was in its defensive position in a Barbette.  It has not been learned how the Thompson Machine Guns came to be out of the officers’ quarters unless preparations were under way for the patrol to leave early the next morning.  The ammunition was kept in a specially built strong room under the floor of the barracks, and kept securely locked. Proper care had been taken for the security of the weapons and ammunition.  The large amount of Springfield had been sent from Bluefields, when the detachment was first formed and sent up.  ¶  8. Seven of the loyal Guardia who worked their way down the river to Cabo Gracias, are now en route here, and will be closely examined on their arrival.  It has been definitely determined that one Sergeant, and fourteen men composed the group who finally entered Honduras.  It is believed that initially only a few were disgruntled, and forced the better element to join them by telling them they were equally involved in anything happened.  ¶  9. Just how far or how general this feeling of unrest and dissatisfaction exists has not been ascertained, but will make every effort to find out.  ¶  10. The Board of Inquest is now in session and upon its completion a Board of Inquiry will be held.  ¶  L. L. LEECH"

3.     9 April 1932.
Report on Recent Occurrences at Kisalaya.  Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 3.   
[Statement of 2nd Lt. Carlos Reyes, p. 1.]    "LT. REYES, CARLOS STATEMENT.  ¶  I, Carlos Reyes, Lieutenant in the Guardia National, hereby state that on April 4th, 1932, at 4:00 pm. more or less, I and Lt. Levonski disposed to issue clothing to the members of the guardia detached at this barrack, Kisalaya, Department of Northern Bluefields, and for this ordered the detachment for formation and started to issue for the more in need, taking in consideration what we had in stock.  After, continued issuing to the rest of the members an article a piece so as to get everybody supplied.  But among these last guardias, the Raso Salmeron, Pablo P. #2970 emerged saying that he had already been long in the guardia and yet he had only received a suit and that in that case, it should be rather better they would not give him even [suit] stepping out the formation and going to sit on the barrack steps by the side of Sgt. Jimenez.  Then Lt. Levonski on hearing those remarks of Salmeron, offered this man to be put in jail, then all the members of the company looked each other and Lt. Levonski ordered the Cabo de Guardia again but he also was disobeyed, then addressing to Sgt. Jimenez, said “Well, Sgt. What do you wait?” to which he answered “that all what Raso Salmeron had said was correct”.  Then I going down the office steps ordered to the Sgt. and Raso Salmeron to pass to the brigs to which Sgt. Jimenez answered, “I’m going to get ready” getting up from the steps and going in where he had his cot and coming out right after holding a gun machine, Sub Thompson, also calling to the company to get their rifles.  I went back in the office and turned toward the right and held Lt. Johnson rifle, loading it and taking position of defense.  Then, in that moment, the company in choir yelled “to the trenches boys’ which are 20 yds. of distance to the office.  Lt. Levonski held his pistol 45 started speaking to the company, that they would not do that and addressing to the Sgt. told him “Lay that off. Sgt. What are you going to for goodness sake, I beg you,” to which he answered, “Lieutenant Reyes come out and we won’t do any harm” without referring to whom these words were meant to.  Then Lt. Levonski forwarded to the gun machine, Browning, which we had in the office and still on begging, didn’t want to fire with the machines, but they from the trenches broke fire against ourselves, to which fire I was wounded on my right side and fired several shots with the rifle, so, I am certain Sgt. Jimenez was wounded in a leg but don’t know which one. The fire was so heavy maintained with 2 Thompson machines, 1 Browning rifle and Krag rifles.  I then observed that Lt. Levonski did not fire, disposed to go close to him and examined him under a table, and saw him bended on the machine, inactive and smeared with blood, for which I realized was dead.  When I saw that, noticed that they got close to ourselves, and determined to escape toward several burnt houses which are located about 500 yds. of distance from there where I could hide and in the meantime I ran, heard they said “there he goes, scoundrel, shoot him” and heard several shot sounds for which I could detect they were machine and rifles, and so they still wounded me again in my left arm.  Once in my hidden place, heard the noise they made when looking for me with much earnest, without finding me, so they determined to press the fire all over the area.  Besides being in my hidden place could detect that they went on drinking at Mr. Abraham Martinez commissary, which it had recently been established up there.  Instants after, heard that they took a schooner and having all women and children go aboard they cleared bound Mocarina.  After they have gone, I came out my hidden place and walked, always holding my rifle.  I determined to go and see Lt. Levonski, so, reached the office, took a package of matches out of my pockets and placed me by a table and took two sticks and put them between my teeth and scratched it with my right hand and examined Lt. Levonski and recognized that he was absolutely dead.  This was at 7:00 pm more or less.  After I . . . "

4.     9 April 1932.
Report on Recent Occurrences at Kisalaya.  Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 4.   
[Statement of 2nd Lt. Carlos Reyes, p. 2.]    " . . . looked around and found that everything had been destroyed, robbed and lost.  After I went out the office and walked toward a camp tent where I found two pillows, one sheet etc., and determined to lay down.  As the wound caused me so much pain and was bleeding constantly it was impossible to fall asleep for me, and it was about 9:30 pm. when I detected there was somebody lighting with flash light at the commissary and wishing to inquire who mere, got up and went by the office up to 12 yards from the place and noticed that they were robbing and heard someone say “There is beer here, who wants one?” and to these words could detect the Raso Pantoja, Juan R. #1443 was one of them, another was Rafael Bucardo #3183 and two more who could not distinguish or identify.  When I recognized my imprudence, I returned and did hide on back the toilet.  Moments later, they went in the office and went in the barrack and went to my tent, and once there when finding blood smears said “look, Lt. has been here, so he isn’t dead,” and went up on walking to the kitchen, and after they returned and went to the river shore and took a boat again bound to Macarina. Spent the night in a little house out there, and went the following day in the morning on a trail to Waspan, this was on Tuesday.  Once there, the Indians made me the first care, moments later the Alcalde of Saupuka arrived to whom gave order to me to Kisalaya to pick up Lt. Levonski body and all the guardia articles.  About 2:00 pm. the Alcalde advised me to move to the other side, being there safer, so I did, ordering him to organize a civil guardia to protect him, and for that purpose I gave him my pistol and to another indian of his own trust gave my rifle.  About 4:30 pm. the Alcalde returned with Lt. Levonski corpse, bringing lard, beans and rise left up there, to determine to cook some food for the people who were guarding by.  Spent there the night, and there were also many rumors that they were coming back, but nevertheless they didn’t show up.  Next day, Wednesday, about 8:00 am determined to bury Lt. Levonski corpse for I didn’t see any airplane coming nor patrol appearing coming from port, but about ½ hour later when I was getting ready to go to Camp Gracias, together with the Alcalde and the guards, heard the airplanes coming, run to the river shore and ordered that the people should not move and proceeded to unfold a sheet on the ground and making an R. my second name initial with the second and placing me in the center by the side, so as to get the aviators recognize me, as they did.  So after they landed they pick me up and brought me over into port. Before finishing my narration state that the company behavior with exception of CH Tercero, Cabo, who me I saw and several others whom was told about, was aggressive, for Tercero is the only one whom I personally saw going out the office with no rifle nor equipment, and in a way of running about.  ¶  As antecedents to this infaust happening, remember that about two weeks ago, just at the time when forming for routine work, someone said “do not go out for formation, let them come to make us to”, this, adding to the fact of selling beer up there and to a rumor which came to me through a mosquita, assured that they had already planned for this deed and those purposes were to kill the three American officers and after, join to the outlaws, which all these facts made to judge that there was ill preparation against the officers in this detachment.  For my part I remember I in certain occasion told Lt. Levonski that the selling of beer might be unadvisable, to which he smiled and didn’t get any answer from him.  ¶  Carlos Reyes  ¶  2nd. Lt. G.N."

5.     9 April 1932.
Report on Recent Occurrences at Kisalaya.  Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 5.   
[Statement of Juanita Castillo, p. 1.]   "STATEMENT OF JUANITA CASTILLO  ¶  I was in my house when I heard Lt. Levonski say “No, Sergeant, don’t fire that gun.”  All Guardia were in the trenches and the Sergeant was standing on the ground in front of the office building.  Lt. Levonski was standing in the doorway.  When the Sergeant turned the gun loose on Lt. Levonski I immediately left and took refuge in the General Moss building.  As I got there I saw Lt. Reyes running from the scene toward the cantina of Adrian Martinez and saw Guardia in the trenches shooting toward the office building. Raso Pantoja was patrolling around office with an automatic shooting toward Lt. Reyes.  ¶  I then left Kisalaya for the jungle with a little girl.  Ahead of me I saw Green and Blandon.  Half an hour later I went back to see if they had killed Lt. Reyes.  The Guardia called me and told me to hurry up at the same time calling me a low down woman.  I was forced to join them. As I joined the mutineers Vivian Hernandez had an automatic and said “See, I am going to kill you, puta.”  Sergeant Jimenez told Hernandez “No don’t shoot her, wait.”  “But listen here, puta, you are going with me.”  I told him that I was going but I needed some clothes and blankets and the Sergeant said to me “Alright go and get your damned clothes.”  When I got to my house, escorted by a sentry named Frederico Flores he took all Lt. Reyes equipment and said “Now get mad, puta, I am going to wear your man’s clothes.” (Reyes)  Then he escorted me to the mutineers and the Sergeant ordered me to go aboard the gasoline boat of Abram Martinez.  I did not go aboard as I needed another dress I had left in the house.  The Sergeant sent me to get it with another Guardia (Salmeron).  As I got into the house I found F. Flores trying Lt. Reyes’s clothes on and he said “Are you sore at me?” Salmeron and I left the house for the boat, leaving Flores in the house.  When I boarded the gasoline boat Mr. Martinez and brother were there and several pitpans loaded with Moskito women.  In two empty boats they put all ammunition and the heavy Browning in the gasoline boat.  The Sergeant told all the women to go and if they saw any Guardia come up river, tell them that you don’t know anything about this.  ¶  They started the motor and started up river with two boats trailing.  While going up river Guardias were throwing grenades and firing.  A few Guardias were walking up along the beach also firing and throwing grenades.  The Guardias kept on asking me where Lt. Reyes was hiding and insulting me terribly.  The Sergeant fired three discs of ammunition towards the edge of the river, shells falling at my feet.  The Guardias walking on the beach came aboard.  We kept on going at night until the boat struck shallow water.  Mrs. Martinez informed the Sergeant that he couldn’t go any further.  He told Mr. Martinez and brother that they were not going to kill them.  They then jumped off the boat and got to the beach.  Then all opened fire at them in the darkness.  This happened at Mocorin.  We all disembarked here and the Sergeant suggested to the others that it was safe to go back to Kisalaya to get something to eat and take all the provisions.  Cabo Medina and A. Alvares got aboard on one of the small boats to guard ammunition and five men boarded the other pitpan to get provisions.  These men were Pantoja, Balles, Bucardo, Julio Salazar, Lopez and Castellon.  ¶  We were on the beach waiting and they took much time and the Sergeant was nervous and in pain.  He ordered a native woman of Mocorin to make some hot water for his leg.  He ordered Taylor and Hernandez to go and get men (civilians) to paddle canoes with orders if they refused to shoot them, they got four men and two women.  When the provision boat came they left the gasoline boat there and proceeded up river.  All night we travelled till at Saulalla we encountered about eight boats coming down river and the Sergeant ordered them to go back, they could not pass.  The Sergeant asked them where Laimus was but did not proceed because it was daylight and said he was afraid of two planes. We stayed in Saulalla till 3 pm. Tuesday.  Upon arrival in Saulalla 5 a.m. they took everything out of the boats and put it on the banks of river and covered it with branches of trees.  They pulled boats ashore and turned them over on the beach, we got under cover of trees and selected clothes they stole. . . . "

6.     9 April 1932.
Report on Recent Occurrences at Kisalaya.  Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 6.   
[Statement of Juanita Castillo, p. 2.]   " . . . ¶ While they were talking and treating the Sergeant’s leg and fixing the machine gun I heard them say it was no good.  They threw their Nicaraguan insignia, issued clothes to the three prisoners they had in Kisalaya and said they intended to mutiny about two months ago.  Sergeant said he was sure that only one Macho was killed, they tried to kill all of them, especially Lt. Levonski because he worked them too much, sometimes they did not have enough time to eat, that they had to go back to work.  They were going to do this drunk or sober.  They did not like that life taking orders and being abused by the Macho and that they wanted to talk to the Jefe of the bandits and join them. Balles said to the Sergeant “Let’s go to Honduras”.  Sergeant said “No, it is bad for us at this time in Honduras, Capt. Inman could send a radio to Honduras to arrest us and lose our life, it is best to join the bandits only for about three months, within this time they will cool off about Lt. Levonski’s affair and then we can go to Honduras.”  Balles did not agree to go with the bandits.  “Neither do I” said Jose.  Salmeron said “You two had better come along.”  ¶  The Sergeant went to sleep.  When he got up I told him I wanted to go home and he kept saying “No.” I was trying all the time.  About 11 o’clock Tuesday morning he said that I could go.  While I was getting my things together he changed his mind and said that I could not go until 5 p.m.  All the Guardia were laughing and said “When you pass by Kisalaya tell Lt. Levonski to give you a pass so that you can go ahead.”  “When you get to Puerto Cabezas give my best regards to Lt. Reyes” said Estrada.  Salmeron said “Tell Capt. Inman that I am coming to Puerto Cabezas to let him take another $10, or mine.” “Pentoja sends regards to Apendano.”  The Sergeant advised me to tell nothing about the affair to anybody in Puerto Cabezas.  If Capt. Inman asks you anything tell him that we will be back the 15th of May. Castellon said “No, no, Sergeant it is better the first of May” “No” said the Sergeant “it is better the 15th” We are good men and we have enough good arms.”  All the men then said “Viva al Sergento.”  They then fixed rifle grenades.  The heavy Browning was no good and they said to throw it in the river for they could not carry excess baggage.  ¶  I was waiting for a pitpan.  The Sergeant said “When you get where my woman lives tell her to notify me by an Indian if Lt. Peterson and Guardia are in Kisalaya.  My woman can get you into Puerto Cabezas.  Estrada said for us to tell everybody of authority that I went into the Savannahs when the shooting took place and that I do not know a thing about it.  About 3 p.m. a Moskito woman came down river in a pitpan and the Sergeant told her she could not pass, she said that she did not want to pass by Kisalaya at night.  Then I asked him if I could go with her, he gave me $5.00 to buy myself something to eat, I got into the Moskito’s boat and started down river.  At 8 or 9 o’clock we arrived at Kisalaya. Below us many fires on the beach, Indians were cooking about 1000 yards below Kisalaya and here I found Lt. Reyes wounded on the chest and arm.  I told Lt. Reyes to go to Cabo Gracias.  Then Lt. Reyes showed me the body of Lt. Levonski who was taken from Kisalaya by Indians by order to Lt. Reyes and he gave orders to Indians to make a box for Lt. Levonski, purchased 30 cents worth of nails and buried him across the river on the Kisalaya side about 8 a.m. Wednesday and about 9:30 a.m. the aeroplanes came."

7.     9 April 1932.
Report on Recent Occurrences at Kisalaya.  Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 7.   
  "DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN BLUEFIELDS  ¶  PUERTO CABEZAS, NICARAGUA  ¶  9 April 1932  ¶  STATEMENT OF EDWARD J. SUPRENANT CONCERNING THE MUTINY OF KISALAYA, NICARAGUA  ¶  I, Lt. Edward J. Suprenant, Guardia Nacional, while District Commander of Moss Commandancia on or about the 4 April 1932, at 0300 received a telephone call from Louisiana Farm and upon answering it a Cabo Jose Tercero ask me to come there as he had something very important to tell me.  As I know this man was the corpsman at Kisalaya I immediately proceeded from Moss Commandancia and upon arriving at Louisiana Farm met this man.  He became very irrational upon seeing me and I ask him to tell me about it and so he said that Monday afternoon two guardia were fighting over 3 pair of pants in front of the cuartel at Kisalaya.  After a while one of the men ran into the barracks and came back with a sub Thompson.  Upon seeing this he knew something was wrong and immediately ran to the rear of the cuartel.  As he was running he heard Lt. Levonski yell, then a burst of shots.  He then ran down towards the river and as he was running he said that it seem all the guardia were shooting, rifle grenades were going off and in general an awful uproar.  He then jump into a pitpan and went down to Saupuga and from there he came into the lines of Louisiana and called me up.  The above information was all jumble up and I had to have the man repeat and repeat.  He was about half crazy and would stop in a middle of a sentence to beg me not to kill him.  I assured him each time that not to worry.  I then left Louisiana Farm and went back to Moss Commandancia where I told the Sergeant of the Guardia to put him in the cuartel.  He then began to scream and beg me not to kill him and beg the guardia not to let me kill him.  I felt rather sorry for him and told the guardia to put him in my room where he would be alone and could rest.  I then cleared that Commandancia for Vaccaro Commissary where I could call up Puerto Cabezas over the phone privately.  I call up Captain Inman at about 2340, 4 April 1932 and inform him of all that had happen so far.  He then give me orders to go to Cuyutigne where Lt. Peterson was with a patrol waiting for Lt Reyes from Kisalaya.  I cleared at about 0800, 9, April 1932, from Moss Commandancia arrived at Logtown about 0100.  Cleared here and arrived Cuyutigne at 0500, met Lt. Peterson and found out patrol of Lt. Reyes had not come in at Cuyutigne. Returned and called from Louisiana Farm this information.  Arrived at Louisiana Farm at 0600.  Upon arriving at Moss Commandancia guard informed me that this guardia Jose Tercero had climbed through the read door which was not completed and had no stairs had escaped.  I called up Captain Inman and informed him of this.  ¶  Edward J. Suprenant  ¶  Lieutenant, Guardia Nacional"

8.     9 April 1932.
Report on Recent Occurrences at Kisalaya.  Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 8.   
"GUARDIA THAT WERE AT KISALAYA ON THE 4 APRIL 1932.  ¶  Lt. Levonski, Charles J.  ¶  Lt. Reyes, Carlos  ¶  Sgt. Jimenez, Sebastian, #3427  ¶  Cabo Blandon, Simeon, #3422  ¶  Cabo Medina, Carlos S. #4848  ¶  Raso Alvarez, Antonio O. #4812  ¶  Raso Balles, Jose, #3421  ¶  Raso Bricano, Felipe #4763  ¶  Raso Bucardo, Rafael V. #3183  ¶  Raso Castellon, Francisco #3191  ¶  Raso DeVia, Thomas #3027  ¶  Raso Estrada, Alejo G., #4643  ¶  Raso Florez, Aurelio #4729  ¶  Raso Flores, Federico #2828 ¶  Raso Gonzales, Jose A. #4594  ¶  Raso Green, William B., #4766  ¶  Raso Gudiel, Santiago #3217  ¶  Raso Hernandez, Vivian #3004  ¶  Raso Lopez, Francisco S., #4637  ¶  Raso Osorio, Carlos C. #4629  ¶  Raso Pantoja, Juan R. #1443  ¶  Raso Salazar, Julio R., #4653  ¶  Raso Salmeron, Pablo F. #2970  ¶  Raso Sequeira, Jose M., #4759  ¶  Raso Shaw, Frank #3324  ¶  Raso Taylor, Garfield #4479  ¶  Cabo Tercero, Jose T., #2660  ¶  LIST OF GUARDIA THAT DID NOT DESERTED  ¶  Cabo Blandon, Simeon #3422 now at Cabo Gracias  ¶  Cabo Medina, Carlos S. #4848 now at Cabo Gracias  ¶  Raso Davis, Thomas #3027 now at Cabo Gracias  ¶  Raso Green, William R., #4766 now at Cabo Gracias  ¶  Cabo Sequeira, Jose M., #4759 now at Cabo Gracias  ¶  Cabo Shaw, Frank #3324 now at Cabo Gracias  ¶  Cabo Taylor, Garfield #3379 now at Cabo Gracias  ¶  Cabo Tercero, Jose T. #2660 reported at Moss Farm but later run away."

10 April 1932.
Radiogram from Philip, Puerto Cabezas, to Comsperon.  
"ALL QUIET PUERTO CABEZAS AREA.  ONE SERGEANT AND 14 IN GUARDIA DESERTED TO HONDURAS WITH ABOUT 3 AUTOMATIC WEAPONS 12 RIFLES AND 15000 ROUNDS AMMUNITION.  POST AT KISALAYA REESTABLISHED REDUCED COMPLEMENT BEING REENFORCED, MORALE GUARDIA AFFECTED SOMEWHAT BUT SITUATION IN HAND. COMMANDER NORTHERN DISTRICT OF BLUEFIELDS ON GROUND CONDUCT BOARD INQUEST COURT INQUIRY AND REMAIN PUERTO CABEZAS UNTIL ABOUT 15 APRIL.  POSSIBLE BANDIT ACTIVITIES ANTICIPATED IN ABOUT TWO WEEKS. FURTHER STAY NOT CONSIDERED NECESSARY AT THIS TIME.  UNLESS DIRECTED OTHERWISE WILL DEPART TOMORROW MONDAY ARRIVE CRISTOBAL ABOUT 1600 22 APRIL. . . . "

1.     11 April 1932.
Court Inquiry into the Mutiny at Kisalaya before Capt. Harry J. Scholtes, Capt. Orrel A. Inman, Capt. William W. Davies, 1st Lt. Robert L. Peterson, Judge Advocate, Puerto Cabezas, p. 1.  
"The court met at 1:15 p.m. Present: Captain Harry J. Scholtes, (MC), G.N. de Nic., (Lieut. (CC), U.S.N.), Captain Orrel A. Inman, G.N. de Nic., and (Captain, U.S.M.C.), Captain William W. Davies, G.N. de Nic., members; and (1st-Lt. USMC), First Lieutenant Robert L. Peterson, G.N. de Nic., judge advocate. (2nd Lieut. USMC)  ¶  The court was cleared and the judge advocate read the precept, original prefixed marked “A”.  ¶  All matters preliminary to the inquiry having been determined, and the court having decided to sit with open doors, the court was opened.  ¶  The judge advocate read the precept.  ¶  Each member, the judge advocate and the interpreter were duly sworn.  ¶  No witnesses not otherwise connected with the inquiry were present.  ¶  A witness called by the judge advocate entered, was duly sworn, and was informed of the subject matter of the inquiry.  ¶  Examined by the judge advocate 1.Q, State your name, occupation, and residence.  A. Juanita Castillo, housekeeper, Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua.  ¶  2.Q. State all you know of the happenings at Kisalaya on April 4, 1932.  ¶  A. I was in my house when I heard Lieutenant Levonski say, “No Sergeant, don’t fire that gun.”  All the Guardia were in the trenches and the Sergeant was standing on the ground in front of the office building.  Lieutenant Levonski was standing in the doorway.  When the Sergeant turned his gun loose on Lieutenant Levonski I immediately left and took refuge in the general mess building.  As I got there I saw Lieutenant Reyes running from the scene toward the cantina of Adrien Martinez and saw the Guardia in the trenches shooting toward the office building.  Raso Pantoja was patrolling around the office with an automatic shooting toward Lieutenant Reyes.  I then left Kisalaya to the jungle with a little girl. ahead of me I saw Green and Blandon.  Half an hour later I went back to see if they had killed Lieutenant Reyes.  The Guardia called me and told me to hurry up, at the same time calling me a low down woman.  I was forced to join them, as I joined the mutineers Vivian Hernandez had an automatic and said “See, I am going to kill you, puta.”  Sergeant Jimenez told Hernandez “No, don’t shoot her, wait” but listen here, puta, you are going with us.”  I told him that I was going but that I needed some clothes and blankets and the Sergeant said to me “All right go get your damned clothes.”  When I got to my house escorted by a sentry named Frederico Flores he took all Lieutenant Reyes’ equipment and said “Now get mad, puta, I am going to wear your man’s clothes.”  Then he escorted me to the mutineers and the Sergeant ordered me to go aboard the boat of Abram Martinez.  I did not go aboard as I needed another dress I had left in the house and the Sergeant sent me to get it with another Guardia named Salmeron.  As I got to the house I found Frederico Flores trying Lieutenant Reyes’ clothes on and said “Are you sore at me?”  Salmeron and I left the house for the boat, leaving Flores in the house.  In two empty boats they put all the ammunition and in the gasoline boat they put the heavy Browning.  They started up the river with the three boats, the Guardia throwing grenades . . . "

2.     11 April 1932.
Court Inquiry into the Mutiny at Kisalaya before Capt. Harry J. Scholtes, Capt. Orrel A. Inman, Capt. William W. Davies, 1st Lt. Robert L. Peterson, Judge Advocate, Puerto Cabezas, p. 2.  
[p. 13 in original pagination; pages 2-12 not included here.]   " . . . 2. Q. State all you know of the death of the late Lieutenant Levonski.  ¶  A. At 1:00 a.m. 6 April 1932 the outpost commander at Moss Farm reported to me that Practicante Jose Tercero had just arrived from Kisalaya in a bad mental state, claiming that at about 4:30 p.m. 4 April 1932, the troops at Kisalaya had mutinied and were shooting up the post, that he had left at the first shot and knew nothing further.  At 0800, 6 April 1932, Lieutenant Cipolloni and I left Port in two planes, arrived over Kisalaya at 0900.  The outpost and building were intact, flag still flying but was apparently absolutely deserted. Drops were made and repeated efforts to attract attention met with no avail.  We then scouted the river and at a sandbar, Ulwas Dakura, landed and picked up Lieutenant Reyes who was seriously wounded in the left arm and right breast.  Reyes stated that Jimenez with fourteen other Guardia had mutinied, at 1630 4 April 1932, killing Lieutenant Levonski, seriously wounding himself and had taken off up river with all arms and ammunition in the post.  He also stated that several faithful Guardia had broken away and headed, some to Cabo Gracias and, he thought some for the line over the savannahs.  He also stated that the remains of Lieutenant Levonski had been brought down river by Indians at his orders, and had been buried on the bank of the river at Waspan about 0800 that same norming.  We rushed Reyes to the Guardia Hospital in Puerto Cabezas, en route picking up a patrol under Lieutenant Peterson of twelve Guardia at Cuy Tigne, dropped orders to Lieutenant Peterson to proceed at once to Kisalaya and hold the post until further orders.  A report of what was then known was dropped to him with the message.  At 1730 the planes were again dispatched up the Coco River in an attempt to locate and if possible destroy the mutineers and, or then, return to pick up remains of Lieutenant Levonski which had been ordered exhumed by myself earlier in the morning and returned with them to Puerto Cabezas.  The remains were buried in Guardia Cemetery, Puerto Cabezas at 1500, 8 April 1932, by order of the Jefe Director.  In the morning of 7 April about 0900, I arrived by airplane at Kisalaya, found patrol under Lieutenant Peterson had already taken over command of post.  Inspection of the post disclosed that the mutineers had taken all arms and ammunition as per list appended marked “B”.  The radio set had been completely demolished and all effects and records of Lieutenant Levonski’s had been destroyed or scattered throughout the post.  The names of men who broke away and reported in to Cabo Gracias as per list appended marked “C”.  Rasos Frederico Flores and Antonio Alverez returned part way to Cabo Gracias but through fear changed their minds and went to Honduras.  The men who accompanied the mutineers are as per list appended marked “D”.  The complement of the post at the time of mutiny was one First Lieutenant Charles J. Levonski, one Second Lieutenant Carlos Reyes, one radio operator, and twenty-three enlisted men.  Lieutenant Levonski took command by my orders on 1 March 1932.  The time Lieutenant Levonski took over command while not low, the morale could not be considered as excellent.  During the month and four days in which he commanded I have made five weekly inspections of Kisalaya, each inspection showed a remarkable improvement in conditions of buildings, grounds, and especially the morale of the men.  He had established regular routine with numerous games, interspersed between working and drill periods which pleased the men very much.  The sudden turn of the command in this mutiny is unexplainable as on the morning of 4 April I inspected the post and paid the command, leaving there at 1500 by airplane.  The command was in excellent shape, cheerful and apparently thoroughly contented.  ¶  3. Q. What do you mean by “not very excellent morale” previous to Levonski’s arrival?  ¶  A. The men were not very cheerful and not very prompt in obeying orders but questions put by myself to various men brought out no cause for this.  It appeared to me as though the command were stagnating. . . . "

3.     11 April 1932.
Court Inquiry into the Mutiny at Kisalaya before Capt. Harry J. Scholtes, Capt. Orrel A. Inman, Capt. William W. Davies, 1st Lt. Robert L. Peterson, Judge Advocate, Puerto Cabezas, p. 3.  
[p. 15 in original pagination; page 14 not included here.]  " . . . Neither the court, the judge advocate nor any party of the inquiry desired any more witnesses.  ¶  The judge advocate desired to make no opening argument.  ¶  The inquiry was finished, all parties thereto withdrawing.  ¶  The court having thoroughly inquired into all the facts and circumstances connected with the allegations contained in the precept, and having considered the evidence adduced, finds as follows:  ¶  FINDING OF FACTS.  ¶  1. That Charles J. Levonski, late sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps and first lieutenant, Guardia Nacional de Nicaragua, was commanding the Guardia Detachment at Kisalaya, Nicaragua and that at or about 4:30 p.m., 4 April, 1932, he did meet his death at Kisalaya, Nicaragua, as a result of gunshot wounds inflicted by mutinous guardia under his command, and that his second in command Second Lieutenant Carlos Reyes, Guardia Nacional de Nicaragua, was seriously wounded in the upper left arm and superficially in the right chest, under the same circumstances.  ¶  2. That at or about 4:30 p.m., 4 April, 1932, certain members of the Kisalaya command did mutiny and desert the Guardia Nacional de Nicaragua, and that they did loot the post and carry away arms, ammunition, and equipment, property of the Nicaraguan Government, as enumerated below:  ¶  25 Grenades, rifle; 2 Dischargers, grenade rifle; 1 Rifle Springfield, #327131; 1 Rifle Browning Automatic, #65105; 4 Carriers, grenade rifle; 10192 Rounds, ammunition, Springfield cal 30-50; 1987 Rounds, ammunition, pistol, cal 45; 20 Magazines, Browning, automatic; 3 Thompson Sub-machine guns #5219-5029; 6 Drums, Thompson Sub-machine gun; 1 Belt, pistol; 4 Lanterns, kerosene; 1 Pitcher, agate; 2 Pens, dish, metal; 2 Pots, large, agate; 1 Pot, small, agate; 1 Tub, large, metal; 2 Pans, frying; 5 Spoons, large, metal; 1 Fork, large, metal; 1 Ladle, agate; 2 Basins, agate; 3 Shovels; 1 Pick; 2 Axes; 1 Machine gun, Browning #146849; 1 Cover barrel BMG; 3 Buckets; 3 Padlocks; 14 Chain, inches; 100 Rope, feet; 3 Pouches, drum, magazine, STEG; 1 Saw, hand; 1 Transmitter and receiver, type, BC-7 serial #27; 1 Box, type DC-102 serial #248; 1 Bag, equipment and 2 cranks complete; 1 Battery, type B; 3 Batteries, dry cell; 1 Kit, tool; 1 Regulator, voltage M-MC-52; 1 Tape, friction, roll; 4 Machetes; 6 Machetes, w/scabbards; 6 boxes, clothing; 1 Hammer, carpenter; 1 Whetstone; 1 File, flat; 2 Drivers, screw; 2 Knives, butcher; 2 Bags, canvas; 1 Saddle, pack; 10 Capotes, de uli; 4668 Krag ammunition 1898; 9 Grenades, hand; 1 Tripod, BMG #55114; 1 Barrel, extra, BMG; 1 Cover, BMG; 1 Flag, national; 2 rods, cleaning; 2 Panel, plane, sets; 6 Boxes, ammunition, BMG; 1 Can, water, BMG; 1 Condenser, BMG; 1 Package, parts, rifle; 3 Tubes radio WX12; 4 Tubes radio UX210. . . . "

4.     11 April 1932.
Court Inquiry into the Mutiny at Kisalaya before Capt. Harry J. Scholtes, Capt. Orrel A. Inman, Capt. William W. Davies, 1st Lt. Robert L. Peterson, Judge Advocate, Puerto Cabezas, p. 4.  
[p. 16 in original pagination.]   ". . . 1 Scarf, field; 6 Trousers, khaki; 6 Undershirts; 4 Hats, field; [?], khaki; 6 Drawers, knee; 12 Hoes, native  ¶  Thirty one dollars sixty seven cents ($31.67) in each, Quartermaster funds on hand.  ¶  3. That the following Guardia did return to Puerto Cabezas and report to Guardia officials: ¶ Cabo BLANDON, Simson #3422; Cabo MEDINA, Carlos S. #4848; Raso DAVIS, Thomas #3027; Raso GREEN, William R. #4766; Raso SEQUEIRA, Jose M. #4759; Raso SHAW, Frank #3324; Raso TAYLOR, Garfield #3379; Cabo TERCERO, Jose T. #2660 (Reported; ran away crazed from Moss)  ¶  4. That the remains of Charles J. Levonski, late sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps and first lieutenant, Guardia Nacional de Nicaragua, were buried in the Guardia Nacional cemetery in Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua at or about 3 p.m., 8 April, 1932.  ¶  OPINION  ¶  1. That the mutinous Gardia numbered fifteen and that the munity was under the leadership of Sergeant Sebastian Jimenez, G.N. #3427 , Private Juan Pantoja, G.N. #1443, Private Pablo Salmeron, G.N. #2970, and Private Vivian Hernandez, G.N. #3004, and that there had been drinking among the Guardia at Kisalaya that day.  ¶  2. That the mutiny had been premeditated by the four leaders and was directly precipitated by the orders to confine Sergeant Jimenez and Private Salmeron.  ¶  3. That the mutiny was not due to any fault, negligence, or inefficiency on the part of the officers concerned, and that it could not have been averted by any action they would have taken at that time.  ¶  4. That the shots which killed Charles J. Levonski, late Sergeant U.S. Marine Corps and first lieutenant, Guardia Nacional de Nicaragua were fired by a Browning automatic rifle in the hands of Private Juan Pantoja, G.N. #1443.  ¶  5. That the following named Guardia were active in the mutiny and deserted from the Guardia Nacional:  ¶  Sgt. JIMENEZ, Sebastian #3427; Raso BALLES, Jose #3421, Raso BRICENO, Felipe #4763, Raso BUCARDO, Rafael V. #3183, Raso CASTELLON, Francisco #3191; RASO ESTRADA, Alejo G. #4543, Raso GONZALES, Jose A. #4594, Raso GUDIEL, Santiago #3217, Raso HERNANDEZ, Vivian #3004, Raso LOPEZ, Francisco S. #4657, Raso OSORIO, Carlos C. #4629, Raso PANTOJA, Juan R. #1443, Raso SALAZAR, Julio, R. #4653, Raso SALMERON, Pablo P. #2970, Raso FLOREZ, Aurelio #4729  ¶  6. That the death of Charles J. Levonski, late sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps and first lieutenant, Guardia Nacional de Nicaragua, was due to wounds received in line of duty and was not the result of his own misconduct. . . . "

5.     11 April 1932.
Court Inquiry into the Mutiny at Kisalaya before Capt. Harry J. Scholtes, Capt. Orrel A. Inman, Capt. William W. Davies, 1st Lt. Robert L. Peterson, Judge Advocate, Puerto Cabezas, p. 5.  
" . . . RECOMMENDATIONS  ¶  1. That if any of the following named Guardia are apprehended that they be brought before a General Court-Martial and tried for: I- Making a mutiny, II- Murder, III- Assault with intent to commit murder, IV- Theft, V- Destruction of Government property, VI- Desertion:  ¶  Sgt. JIMENEZ, Sebastian #3427; Raso BALLES, Jose #3421, Raso BRICENO, Felipe #4763, Raso BUCARDO, Rafael V. #3183, Raso CASTELLON, Francisco #3191; Raso ESTRADA, Alejo G. #4543, Raso GONZALES, Jose A. #4594, Raso GUDIEL, Santiago #3217, Raso HERNANDEZ, Vivian #3004, Raso LOPEZ, Francisco S. #4657, Raso OSORIO, Carlos C. #4629, Raso PANTOJA, Juan R. #1443, Raso SALAZAR, Julio, R. #4653, Raso SALMERON, Pablo P. #2970, Raso FLOREZ, Aurelio #472  ¶  2. That the following named Guardia be absolved from any connection with the mutiny which culminated in the death of Charles J. Levonski, the late sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, and first lieutenant, Guardia Nacional de Nicaragua:  ¶  Cabo BLANDON, Simeon #3422, Cabo MEDINA, Carlos S. #4848, Raso DAVIS, Thomas #3027, Raso GREEN, William R. #4766, Raso SEQUEIRA, Jose M. #4759, Raso SHAW, Frank #3324, Raso Taylor, Garfield #4479  ¶  Harry J. Scholtes, (Lieut/MC) USN  ¶  Captain, (MC), G.N. de Nic.  ¶  Orrel A. Inman, Captain, USMC.  ¶  Captain, G.N. de Nic.  ¶  William W. Davies, 1st Lieut. USMC  ¶  Captain, G.N. de Nic.  ¶  The record of proceedings of the second day of the inquiry was read and approved, the court being cleared during the reading of so much thereof as pertains to the proceeding in cleared court, and the court having finished the inquiry, then at 4:00 p.m., adjourned to await the action of the convening authority.  ¶  Barry J. Scholtes, Lieutenant (MC), U.S. Navy.  ¶  Captain, (MC), G.N. de Nic., President  ¶  Robert L. Peterson , 2nd Lieut. U.S. Marine Corps.  ¶  First Lieutenant, G.N. de Nic., Judge Advocate."

1.     11 April 1932.
Record of Events, Eastern Area, Month of March 1932, Acting Area Commander Capt. M. Cox, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 1.  
"Reference: General Order No. 140, 1929.  ¶  A. PERIOD FROM: 1 March, 1932. TO: 31 March, 1932. ¶  B. STRENGTH OF COMMAND.  Commissioned Officers 25 Enlisted Men 297  ¶  C. MILITARY OPERATIONS  ¶  Mar. 1 Two amphibians, Lieutenant PARMELEE, Lieutenant DAILEY, USMC., pilots, arrived from PUERTO CABEZAS, embarked Lieutenant CASPERONIS, John P. and raso ALEXANDRIA, GN., as passengers, cleared for MANAGUA, and arrived.  ¶  Lieutenant CASPERONIS, John P., GN., transferred from 7th Co. (EA). to 3rd Co. (Cas), MANAGUA.  ¶  First Lieutenant SATTERFIELD, James H., GN., from Duty to Sick (DENGUE).  ¶  Mar. 4 Two amphibians, Lieutenant RUTLEDGE, Lieutenant SCHWABLE, USMC., pilots, arrived from PUERTO CABEZAS.  ¶  Major WOOD, John C., GN., from Duty to Sick (DENGUE).  ¶  First Lieutenant SATTERFIELD, James H., GN., from Sick to Duty.  ¶  Mar. 5 Two amphibians, Lieutenant RUTLEDGE, Lieutenant SCHWABLE, USMC., pilots, embarked Mr. Edward Ingram, as passenger, cleared for MANAGUA, and arrived.  ¶  Mar. 6 Two amphibians, Lieutenant PUTNAM, Master Sergeant MUNSCH, USMC., pilots, and one enlisted, GN., as passenger, arrived from MANAGUA, cleared for PUERTO CABEZAS, and arrived.  ¶  Major WOOD, John C., GN., from Sick to Duty. . . . "

2.     11 April 1932.
Record of Events, Eastern Area, Month of March 1932, Acting Area Commander Capt. M. Cox, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 2.  
" . . . Mar. 9 Lieutenant LONG, H.F.A., (MC)., GN., from Duty to Sick, DENGUE.  ¶  Mar. 12 Two amphibians, Lieutenant PARMELEE, Lieutenant SCHWABLE, Lieutenant POLLOCK, USMC., pilots, arrived from MANAGUA, cleared for PUERTO CABEZAS, and arrived.  Lieutenant SCHWABLE, disembarked at BLUEFIELDS.  ¶  Two amphibians, Lieutenant PUTNAM, Master Sergeant MUNSCH, USMC., pilots, with two passengers, arrived from PUERTO CABEZAS, embarked Lieutenant SCHWABLE, USMC., cleared for MANAGUA, and arrived.  ¶  Mar. 13 Lieutenant CURGEY, GN., with seventeen enlisted cleared WUANI for CASA VIEJA.  ¶  Mar. 15 Lieutenant SOMARRIBA, GN., and patrol cleared NEPTUNE MINE for TUNKY 0720.  ¶  Mar. 16 Lieutenant SOMARRIBA, GN., and patrol returned NEPTUNE MINE 0800.  Nothing to report.  ¶  Lieutenant CURCEY, GN., and patrol arrived CASA VIEJA.  ¶  Mar. 17 Lieutenant CURCEY, GN., and patrol enroute to NEPTUNE MINE from LA LUNA.  ¶  Mar. 18 Lieutenant COFFMAN, USMC., arrived from UNITED STATES via SS NICARAO.  ¶  Lieutenant CURCEY, CN., and patrol cleared NEPTUNE MINE for WUANI and arrived.  ¶  Lieutenant LONG, H.F.A. (MC)., GN., from Sick to Duty.  ¶  Mar. 19 Two amphibians, Lieutenant JACK, Lieutenant CROFT, USMC., pilots, and Mr. Alfred W. HOOKER, passenger, arrived from MANAGUA, disembarked Mr. HOOKER, cleared for PUERTO CABEZAS, and arrived.  ¶  Major WOOD, John C., GN., detached from the Guardia Nacional and sailed for the UNITED STATES via the SS NICARAO at 2400.  ¶  Mar. 20 Two amphibians, Lieutenant POLLOCK, Lieutenant PARMELEE, USMC., plots, Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ, Juan G. GN., passenger, arrived from PUERTO CABEZAS, embarked Lieutenant COFFMAN, USMC., cleared for MANAGUA, and arrived.  ¶  Captain COZ, Max, GN., promoted to Major, GN.  ¶  Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ, Juan G., GN., to temporary duty MANAGUA, witness General Court Martial.  ¶  Mar. 21 Two Amphibians, flew over and made drops at NEPTUNE MINE and WUANI. This flight was made especially for the purpose of dropping SMALLPOX VACCINE at NEPTUNE MINE.  ¶  Lieutenant LONG, H.F.A., (MC)., GN., from Duty to Sick (DENGUE). . . . "

3.     11 April 1932.
Record of Events, Eastern Area, Month of March 1932, Acting Area Commander Capt. M. Cox, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 3.  
" . . . Mar. 26 Two amphibians, Lieutenant JACK, Lieutenant CROFT, USMC., pilots, arrived from PUERTO CABEZAS, cleared for MANAGUA, and arrived.  ¶  Mar. 27 Two amphibians, Lieutenant SAUNDERS, Lieutenant BINNEY, USMC., pilots, arrived from MANAGUA, cleared for PUERTO CABEZAS, and arrived.  ¶  2. Military duties performed. Military Police of Eastern Area; Training of Personnel; Combat, Reconnaissance, and Administration Patrols.  ¶  3. CONTACTS: - NONE.  ¶  D. POLICE OPERATIONS.  ¶  1. See Departmental Reports.  ¶  2. General Police Conditions, Satisfactory.  On 23 March raso Maximino M. Calero, No. 4530, GN., while preforming guard duty at MUELLE REAL, was attacked by a group of about ten (10) men who were working at that place loading bananas.  Calero in an effort to establish order fired two (2) shots into the air and over the heads of the group.  The shots had the desired effect except in the case of the late Teodulo Diaz, who attempted to rush Calero.  Calero then fired again and the bullet struck Diaz in the abdomen.  Diaz died on 28 March as a result of the wound.  It has been reported that most of the group that attacked raso Calero were under the influence of intoxicating liquor.  Raso Calero is being tried by Consejo de Guerra General.  ¶  On 27 February, 1932, Eustace Campbell, a Jamaican, bookkeeper and assistant manager of the Banco Nacional de Nicaragua in Bluefields was found to have defaulted certain funds pertaining to his countrymen which had, in keeping with an old custom, been turned over to him for deposit.  The shortage at present has been found to be more than twenty thousand dollars ($20,000).  Campbell was the intermediate between the Creole element and the bank. He received deposits for savings accounts and also acted in the capacity of financial advisor.  He issued passbooks with the accounts duly entered and paid to depositors such amounts as they demanded from time to time.  Deposits when made, while entered into the books of the depositors over the signature of Campbell, were never entered into the books of the bank.  ¶  Considerable unrest is manifest at present due to the absence of any definite announcement by the bank that it will assume responsibility for the losses of the depositors.  In fact, the bank auditor has implied that the bank is not responsible and has no intention of making restitutions.  If the accounts of the depositors are not paid in . . . "

4.     11 April 1932.
Record of Events, Eastern Area, Month of March 1932, Acting Area Commander Capt. M. Cox, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 4.  
" . . . full, or should be bank fail to issue a statement in the near future that it will assume full responsibility for the shortages, there is a strong probability of disorders.  ¶  E. INTELLIGENCE.  ¶  1. General State of the Territory Occupied – Quiet.  On 8 March unreliable information reported a group of one hundred bandits (Leader unknown) in the LA LUNA Mine District on the OCONGWAS RIVER.  On 15 March, small bandit groups were reported in the LA LUNA MINE and RIO BAMBANA District below TUNKEY.  On 16 March, a group of ten bandits were reported on the PIS PIS trail ten miles southwest of LAKOS FARM, traveling toward the COCO RIVER.  On 24 March, NEPTUNE MINE reported that bombs had been heard by BIG FALLS in the direction of CASA VIEJA.  Patrols were active in the districts above referred to but failed to confirm any of the reports.  Bandit information for the period has been confined to rumors.  There have been no definite reports of organized bandits operating in the Area during March.  ¶  2. Military situation: - Due to the inactivities of the bandits in this Area during March, there is nothing upon which to base an estimate as to their probable intentions during the month of April.  It is believed, however, that should there be any bandit activities during the month of April, that these activities will be confined to the Department of Northern Bluefields and the Neptune Mine District.  ¶  3. Economic Situation: - On March 19, The Cukra Development Company (United Fruit), increased its export of bananas by approximately sixty thousand (60,000) stems per month.  The improved conditions in the United States market operated to effect the resumption of weekly sailings of the company’s steamers which had been on a bi-monthly schedule since January, 1932.  Each steamer now carries about thirty thousand (80,000) stems of bananas.  ¶  The Mexican Traders Company, a Mobile, Alabama, Corporation, is operating the SS RAMA, which carries from twenty-five thousand to thirty-five thousand stems every twelve days.  The revival of the banana industry affords employment to an increased number of laborers and provides for a maximum of workers on the plantations.  In consequence of the improved economic situation it is estimated that the number of unemployed in Bluefields has been reduced to about one hundred.  The population of Bluefields is approximately eight thousand . . . ."

5.     11 April 1932.
Record of Events, Eastern Area, Month of March 1932, Acting Area Commander Capt. M. Cox, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN Managua, p. 5.  
" . . . 4. No friction has been reported between the Guardia and civil population other than at MUELLE REAL as contained in this report.  The press continues a friendly attitude towards the Guardia.  ¶  5. Political situation – quiet. Mr. Henry F. Springer, assumed office as Alcalde of Bluefields on 7 March succeeding General Eliseo Duarte.  Mr. Springer, has taken a decided interest in his office and has initiated several projects for the benefit of Bluefields.  His attitude towards the Guardia has been friendly.  ¶  6. Weather – Weather conditions have been very good and favorable for patrolling.  River and coastwise transportation schedules have been regular, and visibility for air reconnaissance has been very good.  From 18 March, there were light showers daily, with cool temperatures.  ¶  7. Condition of Telephone and Telegraph Communications: Civilian Tropical Radio Telegraph Company – Excellent.  Kisalaya Guardia – Very Good. Guardia Neptune Mine – Very Good.  ¶  8. Condition of Roads and Trails – Good.  ¶  F. CONFISCATION OF ARMS.  ¶  See Departmental Reports.  ¶  G. TRAINING.  ¶  Training schedules have been maintained.  Discipline has been satisfactory.  There were four courts-martials during the period for minor offenses. Two Summaries and two Ordinaries.  ¶  H. MISCELLANEOUS.  ¶  Entrance examinations for the Nicaraguan Military Academy were conducted for nine civilians on 7, 8 and 9 March.  Four Guardia non-commissioned officers also took the prescribed examination for Second Lieutenants, GN.  Papers were forwarded direct to the Director, Nicaraguan Military Academy.  ¶  Mr. Ralph Sexton and Mechanic, arrived BLUEFIELDS from BALBOA, CANAL ZONE, via aeroplane on 3 March.  Mr. Sexton salvaged four motors, three of which were found to be in very good condition.  The motors were taken from two wrecked Army bombing planes that crashed about twenty miles east of Bluefields in June, 1931.  Mr. Sexton and Mechanic, cleared for the CANAL ZONE on 8 March.  ¶  CIVICOS: BLUEFIELDS 75; LA CHUZ 12, NEPTUNE MINE 76.  PUERTO CABEZAS has no civicos but can muster about twenty-five volunteers in the case of an emergency.  ¶  M. COX ¶  Acting."

17 April 1932.
Informe de Patrulla, 2nd Lt. Francisco Gaitan, Kisalaya, to Comandante del Departamento GN, Novena Companía, Puerto Cabezas, p. 1.

17 April 1932.
Informe de Patrulla, 2nd Lt. Francisco Gaitan, Kisalaya, to Comandante del Departamento GN, Novena Companía, Puerto Cabezas, p. 2.

1.     22 April 1932.
Information of Attack to Cuartel of Kisalaya on 21 April, 1932, by Bandits.  2nd Lt. Francisco Gaitan, Kisalaya, to Department Commander, Dept. of N. Bluefields, 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, p. 1.  
"1. According to reference above mentioned I herewith furnish you with the following information.  On 20th of this present month, about 8:00 AM several pitpans with Mosquito Indians went down the river from Saulala, Santo Domingo, Laguna Tara, Pranza and Urapany who the day before had gone to bring bananas from their properties and to sell the bananas to the contractor of the company E.L.C. of Puerto Cabezas, Señor Eduardo Araña, who travels by motor boat.  They all stated that they had returned due to the fact that there were bandits at Urapany on the Coco River about 30 miles from this Headquarters.  On further questioning they stated that they had seen the bandits who had gone after them and that there were many of them and that two indians who had gone along with them had disappeared and that possible had been made prisoners or killed by the bandits.  ¶  2. On receiving the above mentioned information and thinking that information could be true due to the fact that that was the route taken by the deserters Guardias, I considered that they could be the ones and that had joined the bandits.  I took preventive measures in order to be ready against an attack and knowing they had good arms and ammunition as they took them from this quarters.  I waited all day long expecting that could be possible the return of any of the Indians who disappeared and that I could get some information about the bandits.  ¶  3. About 3:00 PM, Señor Eduardo Araña arrived by motor boat from the Cabo with some provisions for the Guardia and to buy bananas from the mosquito and zambos indians.  We did not receive any other information on the rest of the day.  Mr. Araña placed his motor boat right in front of the headquarters in the river as usual, and to clear next day up to the river to pick up the bananas.  About 1:55 AM of the 21st, bandits started fire against the headquarters from all sides except from the side of the river employing three automatic weapons, rifles, pistols and hand bombs (tin cans).  Guardia answered them with rifles, one Thompson and one Browning.  Bandits increased their offensive attack shouting “vivas” to General Sandino and liberators of their country, and . . . "

2.     22 April 1932.
Information of Attack to Cuartel of Kisalaya on 21 April, 1932, by Bandits.  2nd Lt. Francisco Gaitan, Kisalaya, to Department Commander, Dept. of N. Bluefields, 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, p. 2.  
" . . . death for the dogs and country sellers of the Guardia Nacional.  Raso Marcelino Baquedano #2385, was wounded during the attack by a bullet through his back but was not serious.  While I was with a Thompson a bullet from the bandits struck me on the forehead and I was bleeding much.  Lieut Rodrigues took the machine and continued shooting against the bandits while took care of myself and to continue firing with a Browning.  ¶  4. All shots made by the bandits were against the Officers quarters and Guardia quarters believing that we were sleeping.  I heard voices to say “Fire at the house that the machine is there”.  “Fire on that side that trenches are in there”, it is to say that Rodriguez and myself had all changed and by that way avoiding any other casualties.  The attack ceased at 3:00 AM, bandits retreated to a mountain which is located on the one side of the valley.  The contact lasted one hour and five minutes.  ¶  5. On searching the camp next morning three dead were found and one seriously wounded, the ex-sergeant Sebastian Jimenez who deserted the Guardia on 4 April killing Lieut Levonski and wounding Lieut Reyes.  He had a bandage around the leg of the shot received from Lieut Reyes; all the guardias recognized him, he had high boots, khaki shirt, Guardia hat and device and a “38” special pistol.  Another wounded bandit was found who said was Adres Oviedo, from Leon, that he had joined the bandits at Palacaguina and that they had cleared for Bocay, that Sergeant Jimenez had cheated them saying to attack Kisalaya Cuartel and that very easy to take it became he knew it well, that there were 50 men those who attacked the Quarters being 12 Guardias among the bandits, that the rest were civilians, that there were some more waiting at the ravine and that their intention was to sack El Cabo and later to the railroad track.  He died later as he was seriously wounded.  ¶  When bandits retreated the following loot was taken from them: 50 rounds Krag ammunition.  10 Fuses of dynamite bombs. 60 rounds .38 special ammunition. 2 pistols .38 special. 2 cutachas. 3 handkerchiefs (red and black).  1 hat, Guardia Nacional. 1 hat emblem, GN. 1 pamphlet with Picture of Lieut Pennington with the head of one bandit.  ¶  6. The blood trails left by bandits when retreated indicate that there were about 8 or 10 wounded.  They headed to south for the Leimus mountain, about one and half league from this headquarters.  During the attack bandits used one Thompson Machine Gun, one Browning Rifle, and one Lewis machine Gun and rifles Krag.  When the attack started, Raso Sabas Cornejo #3473, ran toward the river taking senor Araña’s motor boat going in direction of El Cabo, we have not heard of him since.  After exploring the camp well and . . . "

 

3.     22 April 1932.
Information of Attack to Cuartel of Kisalaya on 21 April, 1932, by Bandits.  2nd Lt. Francisco Gaitan, Kisalaya, to Department Commander, Dept. of N. Bluefields, 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, p. 3.  
" . . . and not having any means of communication with the Department Commander at the Fort due to the lack of Radio I sent a mail carrier to Moss Farm Quarters giving information in order to get the plane for the wounded and to get treatment for myself and also to inspect the place of the contact and some other details.  ¶  At 4:00 PM the planes landed from the Fort, but aviators did not have any information of the attack, they were only coming to let me have some office articles.  I furnished them with all information, they took with them Raso Baquedano who was wounded for the Guardia Hospital, they also gave information to Captain Inman, Commander of Department of Northern Bluefields and requested him to send me ammunition and medicines as I expected a new attack during the night as the Guardia deserters had joined with the bandits.  The planes returned to the port carrying Raso Baquedano who was wounded.  After the planes had left, an old woman Silvina Martinez, mosquito indian who was made prisoner by the bandits a couple of days ago at Urapany returned to our camp; while she was with her husband picking bananas bandits appeared, her husband ran away but she could not do it and was apprehended by the bandits.  The night the bandits attacked the Cuartel, she had been left with another group and who were as a reserve, she heard the contact; the bandits with her had only pistols and muzzle-loaders, but those who had come to attack were well armed and had four automatic weapons.  She says that during the contact the bandits left with her were saying “We are sure that the boys will get those bandit Guardias, we are going to tear them to pieces or hang them” and other things.  She also said that the group that had gone to attack the Quarters returned about 5:00 AM, they had eight seriously wounded and two dead that were buried there and that four more were left, two of those were colonels but they did not say their names.  The four left were those we found, they stated that did not have any luck, that one of the automatic weapons had not fired and that they never expected to have so many losses but the Guardias were too sharp shooters.  That the Jefe of the group where she was left was General Juan Morales, that all together were around 90 or 100 but they had only rags and nothing to eat.  They stated that another group would come to Bocay and other from “minas de al Luz”, that they will gather together and will return to Kisalaya and finish with the Guardia because they had plenty arms and that later they would go to sack and turn the rail road track.  Then they released her and told her not to say anything to the Guardia at Kisalaya . ¶  7. After 8:00 AM, this same date, planes arrived with Captain Inman, Department Commander and Lieut Capollony (M), they brought medicines and ammunition.  I showed Capt. Inman the place where they were attacking, also where they had the automatic weapons, articles captured, also the dead bandits who were not buried as I wanted him to have the proof and inspect them, then they were buried.  After the inspection and when I had the first treatment, they returned to the port.  According to later reports this group of bandits had returned to Urapany, Waspook and Bocay. . . . "

4.     22 April 1932.
Information of Attack to Cuartel of Kisalaya on 21 April, 1932, by Bandits.  2nd Lt. Francisco Gaitan, Kisalaya, to Department Commander, Dept. of N. Bluefields, 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, p. 4.   
" . . . 6. I recommend to the Jefe Director, the conduct and good behavior of 2nd Lieut Juan B. Rodriguez and of all the Guardias who took part during the contact, with exception of Raso Sabas Cornejo #3473 GN, who left us during the contact taking his equipment and about 100 rounds of Krag.  Any time this man be captured it is recommended to be judged by Court Martial for the offence above mentioned.  The coolness of all the Guardia was excellent and it is recommended to be cited.  Attached herewith is the list of Officers and Guardia who took part during the contact.  ¶  /s/ Francisco Gaitan."

26 April 1932.
Report of my Patrol.  Lt. J. E. Rourk A., Rama, to Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, p. 1.   
"1. Left Rama with ten Guardias the 21 of April, 32 to chase bandits that were rumored were in “El Garrobo”.  We left there at 11.00 A.M. and got to Quisilala at 1.00 P.M. where we left the motor boat, ordering the boatmen to return to El Rama.  We left Quisilala at 2.00 P.M. taking the trail for Chontales by land. At 8.00 P.M., we got to family by the name of Lopez where I asked for information, if it was true that 100 men had passed there, going by the information I first got at Quisilala . I was informed that only eight men had passed there.  I was told the trail that we were going thru was by no means penetrable by night because it was closed by fallen trees, and being that we had our privation on horses I decided to stay there for the night.  The following morning we got on the trail again and we got to Monte Verde at 10.00 P.M. after having destroyed four bandit camps that we met on our way.  Three camps were of the bandits that in January robbed the Chinese of Muelle Real. In Monte Verde we were informed that the 13 of April, eight men with two horses, one Remington rifle, one Krag with five bullets each, one pistol and two shot guns that they had stolen on their way.  The man that informed us, Pedro Espinoza, was robbed of everything he had.  The same day they continued on this way to Rio Siquia.  The 15 of April they returned, carrying the majority of them two pistols and two horses with a load, that they told Espinoza that they were going to sleep about two hundred yards from his house and if the Guardia arrived of any Juez De Mesta to notify them because they were afraid on account that they had very little ammunition.  We camped there that night and the next day I made up my mind to go to Salte Grande where they told me that there were many accomplices of the robbers.  We left there 5.00 A.M. and we got to Garrobo at 6.00. . . . "

26 April 1932.
Report of my Patrol.  Lt. J. E. Rourk A., Rama, to Col. L. L. Leech, Bluefields, p. 2.  
" . . . P.M. where we took the road by water.  From there on we started to capture accomplices.  We got to Castillo at 10.00 P.M. where we camped after we got hold of other robbers.  The next day we left Pilan and we got there at 2.00 P.M. and there we were informed no robbers had passed there, and that there were no robbers down the river.  We left the same day getting to Garrobo where we met the Patrol of sergeant Chamorro and there we captured other individuals and with the ones we already had amounted to ten.  The following day we left here at 5.00 A.M getting to Muelle Real at 6.00 P.M. and at 10.00 P.M. I sent sergeant Chamorro with five Guardias to capture some individuals that had stolen from the Chinese in January, who had run away to Chontales and had return three days ago.  From there I left at 5 A.M. and on my way I got some information where sergeant Chamorro was because he hadn’t returned. I sent two guardias to look for him and they found him waiting for the men, because they were not here.  Seeing this I continued on my road, from there near to Rama.  We got here at 11.00 A.M. with ten civilian prisoners.  I took away a pistol from a Juez de Mesta that had never gotten out any permit to carry arms.  Sergeant Chamorro arrived at 2.00 P.M. with three civilian prisoners.  I also took away a shot gun from another civilian that had no permit to use it.  ¶  2. Regarding what was said about the bandits, being one hundred, was that the eight robbers had told the people to tell us that they were one hundred armed with machine guns so we would not follow them.  This has been confessed to me by all the prisoners that were with them, and that’s the reason for all the alarm, but the truth is that they were only eight dirty bandits from the neighborhood of Chontales.  ¶  J. E. ROURK A."

26 April 1932.
Radiogram from Nicaraguan Natl Guard Detachment (Lt. Hamas), Nueva Segovia, to Jefe Director GN Managua.  
"8628 LIEUTENANT HAMAS COMMANDING PATROL CONSISTING OF LIEUTENANTS STORMS VOGEL CABCERA AND GUTTEREZ AND FORTY FIVE ENLISTED GUARDIA HAD CONTACT AT POINT TWO ONE THREE DASH FOUR ZERO EIGHT NUEVA SEGOVIA ON APRIL TWENTY SIX AT SIXTEEN HUNDRED.  FIGHT LASTED THREE HOURS.  PATROL DISCOVERED AND ATTACKED WHAT IS THOUGHT TO BE SANDINOS CAMP. SANDINO THOUGHT TO HAVE BEEN PRESENT DURING FIGHT.  ALSO EX-SERGEANT GARDIA AND EX-CORPORAL CORNEJO WHO DESERTED FROM QUILALI.  PERICO CAMP CONSISTED OF THIRTY FIVE SHACKS OF VARIOUS SIZES.  BANDITS ESTIMATED AT TWO HENDRED FIFITY FORMED FIRING LINE SIX HUNGRED YARDS IN LENGTH WHILE GUARDIA OCCUPIED A WELL PREPARED BANDIT DEFENSE POSITION OF ROCKS AND LOGS ABOUT TWO HUNDRED FIFTY YARDS FROM THE BANDITS.  EVIDENTLY THE BANDITS HAD TIME TO OCCUPY THEIR DEFENSE POINT AND RETIRED ACROSS A RAVINE OVER WHICH THE FIRING TOOK PLACE.  BANDITS TRIED TO ATTACK FROM A FLANK BUT WERE DRIVEN OFF.  THEY THEN SCATTERED."

28 April 1932.
Letter from Gen. Augusto C. Sandino, Cuartel General del EDSNN, to Gen. Francisco Estrada.
    (Source:  A. C. Sandino, El pensamiento vivo, v. 2, Sergio Ramirez ed. & comp., Managua, Nueva Nicaragua, 1984, p. 219)    "Mi querido hermano General Estrada:  ¶  El General Irías lleva instrucciones de ponerse bajo las órdenes directas de Ud. y de reconocerle a Ud. Mismo como Primer Jefe de toda la Expedición nuestra en toda la Costa Atlántica. También se le explicó al General Irías que si logramos mediante la Expedición de que me ocupo, el Control de ese Litoral, asumirá Ud. el cargo de Gobernador Intendente, eligiendo Ud. el sitio donde habrá de radicarse con su Estado Mayor, lugar desde donde dirigiriá todo el movimiento político y militar de nuestro Litoral Atlántico.  ¶  [ . . . ]  Le envió esos periódkicos, donde aparece la toma de Villa Nueva; igualmente tenemos informes de la toma de Ciudad Darío, y se dice que para conseguirla tuvieron nuestros muchachos que incendiar algunas casas de la población, y los aviones pusieron fin a la tarea, pero cuando nuestras fuerzas ya estaban ausentes [ . . . ]  ¶  Patria y Libertad  ¶  A. C. SANDINO"

29 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Major M. Cox, p. 1.  
"INSTRUCTIONS: General Order No. 100, 1929, requires Area Commanders and Area Executives to inspect all posts and Guardia in their area once each quarter, and for Department Commanders to inspect all posts and Guardia in their Department once each month, and to submit a report on this form to Headquarters, Guardia Nacional, upon the completion of each monthly or quarterly inspection.  ¶  Only one report is required for each administrative unit for each month or quarter.  ¶  Posts of a unit will be inspected at different times during a period and only one report a month or quarter for each administrative unit is required.  Submitted answers to questions will be so phrased as to cover all posts of Guardia inspected.  ¶  Blank pages are inserted in the back hereof for use of inspecting offers in submitting such supplemental reports as may be deemed necessary."

29 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Major M. Cox, p. 2.  
"The Department Commander had no recommendations to make.  ¶  The buildings at KISALAYA are generally in very bad repair.  All buildings have palm roofs and leak badly during the rainy Season.  There are no shower facilities at this post.  Men bathe in the COCO RIVER.  The condition of all buildings especially so the living quarters are considered depressive and not conducive to good morale.  ¶  RECOMMENDATIONS:  ¶  That if it is intended to maintain a detachment of Guardia at KISALAYA permanently, that a suitable barracks be constructed at that place.  ¶  That under present conditions, men should not be required to serve more than (1) month at a time at KISALAYA.  ¶  That if it is intended to maintain the post at KISALAYA, it should be increased to at least forty (40) enlisted and three (3) officers, to properly carry out its mission.  The mission of this detachment in my opinion is purely an offensive one.  With its present personnel do not believe that this detachment can carry out its mission.  ¶  That KISALAYA be furnished at least four (4) mules with packs for the purpose of evacuating that place should it become necessary to withdraw these Guardia to protect the LINE.  These mules could also be used for patrolling.  ¶  That KISALAYA, MOSS FARM, KIPLA FARM and CAPE GRACIAS, be furnished at least one (1) rifle grenade discharger with rifle grenades.  ¶  That all outposts be furnished athletic equipment.  Suggest Volley Ball.  ¶  M. COX, Major, GN.  ¶  Area Executive Commander"

1.     30 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Capt. O. A. Inman, Puerto Cabezas, p. 1.  
"During this period ended 30 April, 1932.  ¶  INSTRUCTIONS: General Order No. 100, 1929, requires Area Commanders and Area Executive to instruct all posts and Guardia in their area once each quarter, and for Department Commander to inspect all posts and Guardia in their Department once each month, and to submit a report on this form to Headquarters, Guardia Nacional, upon the completion of each monthly or quarterly inspection.  ¶  Only one report is required for each administrative unit for each month or quarter. ¶ As posts of a unit will be inspected at different times during a period and only one report a month or quarter for each administrative unit is required to be submitted answers to questions will be so phrased as to cover all posts and Guardia inspected.  ¶  Blank pages are inserted in the back hereof for use of inspecting officers in submitting such supplemental reports as may be deemed necessary. . . . "

2.     30 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Capt. O. A. Inman, Puerto Cabezas, p. 2.  
"[ - - - ] Schedule issued by headquarters, Guardia Nacional, been carefully followed? (If not [ - - - ] what training has not been carried out, why) YES  ¶  2. What system is employed to insure that all Guardia in a unit receive the instructions prescribed in the Training Schedule?  Roster of men under instruction kept up to date.  ¶  3. Is an officer detailed as instructor and does he actually demonstrate wherever possible the positions, movements, etc., being explained?  YES  ¶  4. Is the daily routine prescribed by Headquarters, Guardia Nacional, being complied with?  (If not, state why.)  YES  ¶  5.  What drills were held for the inspection?  Close and extended order.  ¶  6. State degrees of proficiency shown in: (a) Manual of Arms: Very Good, (b) Close order Drill: Very good, (c) Extended order Drill: Good  ¶  (Note.  The manner in which the men execute Inspection Arms is a fallible indication of the amount of Troop Inspection made by Officer. Where many show awkwardness and unfamiliarity of this movement it indicates neglect of orders in carrying out the prescribed routine.) ¶ 7. How many men fell out for drill for the inspection? Twenty, Puerto Cabezas; all men in Out Posts.  ¶  8. Did the drills indicate that sufficient progress in the training prescribed was being made by men?  YES  ¶  RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING  ¶  1. Are the rifle marksmanship instructions prescribed in the Training Schedule issued by Headquarters, Guardia Nacional, being carefully carried out? YES  ¶  2. Has instructor studied all instruction references and prepared himself sufficiently well to instruct in this subject? YES  ¶  3. Inspect all rifles carefully and note the following: (a) How many rifles are in suitable condition for range firing? [?] (b) How many front sights were defective?  One (c) How may rear sights were defective? Two (d) How many were otherwise found defective for marksmanship on the range? . . . "

3.     30 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Capt. O. A. Inman, Puerto Cabezas, p. 3.  
" . . . 4. Have a sufficient number of prescribed aiming devices been constructed and completed for instruction use?  YES  ¶  5. Conduct an examination of all men in the aiming, position, trigger squeeze, and rapid fire exercises and then answer the following questions: How many men were proficient … In the aiming exercise?  All but fifteen, In assuming the prone position? (15) recruits, In squeezing the trigger?  In assuming the sitting position?  In assuming the kneeling position? In assuming the standing position? In adjusting the sling?  (b) Are all men ready for firing on the range?  All but recruits.  (c) Do you recommend the commencement of firing on the range by the men?  YES  ¶  6. At what places have rifle ranges been constructed? Station - Puerto Cabezas, Land owned by - Bilway Indian Community, Rent paid - None, Leased for period – Indefinite  ¶  7. Are all ranges fully completed and ready for rifle marksmanship firing?  YES  ¶  8. Is there a sufficient supply of range material (targets, spotters, pasters, etc.) on hand for practice and record firing purposes?  (If not state what is lacking) . YES  ¶  9. How much ammunition is on hand and available for range firing?  NONE  ¶ SCHOOLING FOR GUARDIA  ¶  1. Is G.O. No. 57, 1929, being complied with?  YES  ¶  2. How many men were undergoing instruction on the day of the inspection?  (20) Twenty  ¶  3. How many men have been taught to read simple sentences and their names since last inspection?  Two (2)  ¶  4. Is there a supply of proper text books on hand available for use of the students?  YES  ¶  5. How many instructors were employed in the Department or other unit on the day of the inspection?  ONE . . . "

4.     30 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Capt. O. A. Inman, Puerto Cabezas, p. 4.  
" . . . INSPECTION OF CLOTHING  ¶  1. Was the fit of clothing satisfactory?  YES  ¶  2. Was clothing properly marked?  YES  ¶  3. Was clothing neat and clean in appearance?  YES  ¶  4. Did men have required number of pieces of clothing?  NO See G.O. 50, 1928 . ¶  5. Were shoes polished and in good condition?  YES  ¶  6. Are shoes being repaired? YES  ¶  7. Were hats of proper size and neatly blocked?  YES  ¶  8. Have man been cautioned in regard to the selling of their clothing G.O. 27, 50/28  ¶  9. Do the records show that there are many checkages for clothing?  YES  ¶  10. Is the fit of clothing carefully supervised by an officer when issued?  YES  ¶  INSPECTION OF EQUIPMENT  ¶  1. Was this equipment properly marked?  YES G.O. 52/28  ¶  2. In what condition was the equipment?  Fair  ¶  3. Are forms G/N-1612 QM posted in service record books? YES G.O. 51/28  ¶  4. Were all men properly equipped in accordance with G.O. 51, 1928? ¶ BARRACKS AND BUILDINGS  ¶  1. List all buildings occupied by the Guardia in the Area or Department (Note: If Government or municipal owned, so state. If no changes occured information need to be repeated on every inspection report but reference will be made to the report on which initially entered.)  ¶  Station – Ptocabezas, Occupied – 4, For use as – Barracks, Offices & Hospital, Owner – B.B.L. Co, Rental - $25.00, Time of Lease – Indefinite  ¶  Station – Kipla, Buildings Occupied – 1, For use as – Cuartel, Owner – B.B.L. Co., Rental – None, Time of Lease – Indefinite  ¶  Station – Moss, Buildings Occupied – 1, For use as – Cuartel, Owner – B.B.L.Co, Rental – None, Time of Lease – Indefinite  ¶  Station – Toledo Nye, Buildings occupied – 1, For use as – Cuartel, Owner – B.B.L.Co, Rental – None, Time of Lease – Indefinite . . . "

5.     30 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Capt. O. A. Inman, Puerto Cabezas, p. 5.  
" . . . Station – Micalaya, Buildings Occupied – 1, For use as – Barrack, Owner – Marshal, Rental – None, Lease - Indefinite  ¶  Station - Cabo Gracias, Buildings Occupied, 1, For use as – Office, Owner – Mr. Green, Rental – None, Lease – Indefinite  ¶  2. Are the lighting and sewage systems adequate?  YES  ¶  3. Are the quarters of the enclosed men well arranged, adequate and comfortable?  YES  ¶  4. Are they in good police?  YES  ¶  5. Are they in good repair?  YES  ¶  6. What is the condition and arrangement of the furniture and bunks?  Bunks in rows along Bulkhead.  ¶  7. What is the condition of the walls, floors and ceilings of buildings?  Good.  ¶  8. Have presentations been taken for security against fire and theft?  YES  ¶  9. Are the toilet and bathing facilities sufficient for the requirements of the commands?  YES  ¶  10. Are they in good repair?  YES  ¶  11. Are they in good police?  YES  ¶  12. How are rifles kept in quarters? (In racks, against wall?) In racks against wall.  ¶  13. How is equipment kept in quarters? In locker boxes.  ¶  MESSING FACILITIES  ¶  1. How are men throughout the organization rationed?  General Mess.  ¶  2. What was the cost of the ration for the preceding month? 19 cents  ¶  3. What method is used to check ration purchases and issues?  Purchased by Mess Officer checked by Department Commander.  ¶  4. Is the food of good quality and well prepared? YES ¶ 5. How is it served? Cafeteria style. ¶ 6. Is a daily menu prepared and kept on file?  YES  ¶  7. What was the condition of the galley and equipment?  GOOD  ¶  8. Was the mess hall and equipment clean and sanitary?  YES  ¶  9. Is the mess hall large enough for the command? YES ¶ 10. Are the facilities for receipt and storage of articles of the station satisfactory?  YES. . . . "

6.     30 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Capt. O. A. Inman, Puerto Cabezas, p. 6.  
" . . . 1. Are the storerooms for clothing and public property adequate? YES (a) Well arranged? Yes (b) In good police? Yes (c) Secure against fire and theft? Yes (d) Are keys entrusted to enlisted men and civilians? During working hours only.  ¶  2. Is the supply of clothing on hand sufficient for the command?  (State what articles are needed.) Shirts, under shirts, hats, ornaments and hat cords.  ¶  TRANSPORTATION  ¶  1. Is the transportation sufficient for the requirements of the Unit?  NO  ¶  2. How many motor vehicles are not in running condition?  NONE  ¶  3. Of what does the animal transportation consist?  NONE  ¶  4. How many captured animals are on hand?  None  ¶  POST EXCHANGE  ¶  PRISONERS AND PRISON  ¶  1. How many prisoners were confined at the different stations on the dates inspected? Puerto Cabezas (11) eleven.  Note.  Prisoners will be actually verified by inspecting officer.)  ¶  CIVILIAN  ¶  Station – Puerto Cabezas, Guardia – Two (2), Male (11), Female -----, Date of Inspection – 30 April, 1932  ¶  2. Is a Registry Book of Prisoners being carefully kept?  Yes  ¶  3. Did the number of prisoners counted agree with the number of prisoners shown by the Registry Book?  Yes  ¶  4. Check prisoners daily ration statements for the ten days preceding the inspection and report whether the number of prisoners for which rations credit has been taken agrees with the number as shown by the Register Book as being confirmed. . . . "

7.     30 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Capt. O. A. Inman, Puerto Cabezas, p. 7.  
" . . . 5. Were any prisoners having more than six (6) months or more to serve confined?  No  ¶  6. Are the Guardia at the carcel well instructed in the performance of their duty?  Yes  ¶  7. Is the number of sentries adequate enough to prevent escapes?  Yes  ¶  8. When prisoners are taken out of the carcel for work or any other reason as they checked “out” and “in” as they are taken from and returned to the prison?”  Yes.  Are prisoners worked outside of the prison?  Yes  ¶  9. Are the facilities for policing prisoners adequate?  Yes ¶  10. How many cells are there?  Four (4)  ¶  11. Are they so constructed as to prevent the escape of prisoners?  Yes  ¶  12. Have any prisoners escaped since the last inspection?  No  ¶  13. Are prisoners uniformed?  No  ¶  14. How are meals served to prisoners?  In Mess Hall after regular Guardia have eaten.  ¶  15. Are there adequate accommodations for women prisoners?  No  ¶  16. What was the police condition of the prison on the date of the inspection?  Good  ¶  17. What is the general condition of the buildings and grounds of the prison?  Good.  ¶  SANITATION ¶ 1. Are all buildings and grounds in the Department or place being inspected in good sanitary condition? Yes  ¶  CARE OF THE SICK  ¶  1. Is the health of the command good?  Yes  ¶  2. What facilities are available for the care of the sick?  Well equipped Sick Bay  ¶  3. Are any changes necessary or desirable?  No  ¶  4. How many men were on the sick list on the day of the inspection?  Thirteen (13)  ¶  5. How many men have been on the sick list due to venereal disease since last inspection?  Fifteen. . . . "

8.     30 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Capt. O. A. Inman, Puerto Cabezas, p. 8.  
" . . . DEFENSE PLANS  ¶  1. What scheme of defense has been planned for the defense of the barracks and other buildings occupied by the Guardia?  Concentration of all guardia in a controlled position with good field of fire and covered exits for patrols.  ¶  2. Has a Call to Arms order been issued?  Yes  ¶  3. How many of the following arms weapons are available for defense purposes?  Machine Guns: 6 Heavy Brow., 6 Lewis, Ammunition for Rounds – 23,000, Thompsons: 2 Ammunition for Rounds 9, 995, Auto Rifles: 2, Rifle G discharger: 2, Rifle Grenades: 172, Hand Grenades: 18  ¶  4. Are all officers and some reliable men trained in the use of the above weapons?  Yes  ¶  5. How often are such weapons as may be on hand – Fired: Monthly, Cleaned: Biweekly  ¶  6. Are all guardia weapons and ammunition not authorized to be in hands of guardia kept under lock and key?  Yes  ¶  7. What precautions are taken to keep serviceable automatic weapons from being used by a possible enemy either within or without the [?] Essential parts removed and placed under lock and key.  ¶  RECREATION AND AMUSEMENTS  ¶  1. What form of recreation and amusements are provided for enlisted men? None at present . ¶  2. Are there organized football, basketball or other athletics?  No  ¶  3. What liberty is granted enlisted men?  2:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m., 3:00 am to 11:00 pm Sundays  ¶  FIRE PRECAUTION  ¶  1. Of what does the fire fighting force consist? Lumber Co. [?] cart and command with buckets. . . . "

9.     30 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Capt. O. A. Inman, Puerto Cabezas, p. 9.  
" . . . 2. Is it adequate?  Yes  ¶  3. When was the last fire bill published?  (Attach a copy to first inspection report and refer to it in subsequent reports.)  1 Jan. 1932  ¶  4. Is fire drill held?  Yes  ¶  (a) How often? Bimonthly.  ¶  OFFICERS  ¶  1. Have all officers their files of Guardia Orders and publications up to date?  Yes  ¶  2. What officers, if any, speak and read Spanish?  (Give full name and rank).  1st. Lieut. Robert L Peterson, 2nd. Lieut. Hutchcroft, 2nd Lieut. Thompson  ¶  3. Are the other officers studying Spanish? Yes  ¶  4. Does harmony prevail among officers of the unit being inspected?  Yes  ¶  Do the officers frequently confer with the various Departmental Officials to maintain cordial and harmonious relations?  Yes  ¶  5. Are the relations between officers and men cordial?  Yes.  ¶  FUNDS AND ACCOUNTS  ¶  1. Is a cashbook showing all Government funds received and expended being properly kept? (GO #33, 1927 and GO 63, 1928)? Yes.  ¶  2. Are all expenditures made in an authorized manner?  Yes.  ¶  3. Are copies of all receipt and expenditure vouchers being carefully filed?  Yes.  ¶  4. When was the cash account last audited by an inspector? [?] 5.  Is an allotment book being properly kept?  ¶  6. The cash was counted on 28 April and found to be $4,322.74  ¶  7. The cash account and all papers and books pertaining thereto was audited on 28 April.  A separate report thereon is attached hereto.  ¶  8. Do the cash accounts of district commanders or other officers whom cash has been advanced by another officer [?] . . . "

10.     30 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Capt. O. A. Inman, Puerto Cabezas, p. 10.  
" . . . . 11. Are receipts obtained for all such purchases?  Yes  ¶  PROPERTY  ¶  1. Is a property account being carefully and properly kept?  Yes  ¶  2. Are memorandum receipts for property obtained by Department Commanders from Area Quartermasters being carefully filed?  Yes  ¶  3. Is a memorandum receipt property account being kept by the Department Commander to show the count of property on hand?  Yes  ¶  4. When was the last physical inventory of public property taken?  Feb. 6, 1932  ¶  5. By whom was it taken? Department Commander.  ¶  6. Is public property in use and in storerooms being properly cared for?  Yes  ¶  7. Are retained vouchers to the property account properly numbered, briefed and filed?  Yes  ¶  8. Is property purchased in the open market being taken up on property account?  Yes  ¶  9. Are certificates of expenditures being properly prepared and rendered as required?  Yes  ¶  10. Are forms No. 1612 being detached from service record books prior to sending books to Headquarters for closing upon discharge of enlisted men?  Yes  ¶  (a) If so, is this property being taken up on the property account?  Yes ¶ INTELLIGENCE DATA  ¶  1. Is there an intelligence file (box or cabinet) in which all papers of secret and confidential nature are filed in folders and kept under lock and key?  Yes  ¶  2. Are “Guardia Rewards” posted on the bulletin board in the men’s quarters so that each member of the Guardia can keep himself acquainted with the men that rewards are offered for?  Yes  ¶  3. Is a folder of “Guardia Rewards” kept in the police station?  Yes  ¶  ORDNANCE DATA  ¶  1. Does the “Weapons Record Book” show a complete record of [?] and deposited weapons?  (GO 89/28)  Yes . . . "

11.     30 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Capt. O. A. Inman, Puerto Cabezas, p. 11.  
" . . . 2. Does the “Arms Permit Record Book” show a complete record of all arms permits handled by the Department concerned? (GO 9/28)  Yes ¶  3. Are confiscated and deposited weapons secured under lock and key?  Yes  ¶  4. Are deposited weapons tagged with name of owner and date of deposit?  Yes  ¶  POLICE OPERATIONS  ¶  1. By whom are arrests made?  Municipal Guardia  ¶  2. How are prisoners taken to the police station?  On foot  ¶  3. What special orders are issued to patrolmen?  Orders printed on cards.  ¶  4. Do patrolmen carry such orders while on patrol?  Yes  ¶  5. How are reliefs effects?  By sergeant of the Guard.  ¶  6. What is the length of the time of each watch? Four to six hours.  ¶  7. Is a blotter showing arrests made kept at the police station?  Yes  ¶  8. What record other than the blotter is kept to show arrests made, confinements, releases, etc., from day to day?  Card index.  ¶  9. Does the Police Judge cooperate with the Guardia?  Yes  ¶  10. Do any officers attend police court?  Yes  ¶  COMMANDING OFFICER  ¶  1. What theoretical instruction is held for the non-commissioned officers?  N.C.Q. school infantry combat principles and authentic weapon school.  ¶  2. Is there a bulletin board on which to place orders, etc. to be read by the members of the command?  Yes  ¶  3. Does the commanding officer keep a punishment book?  Yes  ¶  4. Do punishments conform strictly to regulations?  Yes  ¶  5. Are the men promptly paid?  Yes  ¶   (a) By whom are they actually paid?  (Be explicit in answering this question).  Department Commander or Dept. Quartermaster.  Always by a commissioned Marine Officer.  ¶  6. Are all officers and men required to wear the prescribed uniform?  Yes . . . "

12.     30 April 1932.
Inspection Report of the 9th Company, Puerto Cabezas, by Capt. O. A. Inman, Puerto Cabezas, p. 12.  
" . . . 10. Are the first sergeant and clerk being instructed and trained in preparation of payrolls?  Yes  ¶  11. Are service record books being properly kept?  Yes  ¶  12. Are the first sergeant and clerk being instructed how to keep the service record books?  Yes  ¶  (a) Who is the instructor? Company Commander.  ¶  13. Are copies of all routine reports and other papers being properly filed?  Yes  ¶  14. Request the commanding officer to furnish a memorandum giving his commendation regarding the improvement of the efficiency of his command or make a statement that he has no recommendation to make.  ¶  It is recommend that the following athletic Gear to sent to this Department.  ¶  6 Base Balls, 5 Gloves, Base Ball, 1 Mitt Catcher, 1 Volley Ball, 1 Basket Ball  ¶  This Department has received no allotment of athletic goods in over a year regardless of frequent requisitions.  ¶  O. A. Inman"

   
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