Header image
the atlantic coast  •  1930A, p. 1
Jan — March 1930

A T L A N T I C    C O A S T    D O C S
thru 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 +

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

   THIS IS THE FIRST PAGE of documents for the FIRST HALF of 1930 on Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast region, housing materials dated from January 1 through the end of March, during Sandino's year-long soujourn to Mexico.

     One of the main items of contention on this page concerns the right of the Nicaraguan government in Managua to tax Miskitu Indians & Creoles on the Coast.  As it turns out, all three governments involved in this extended controversy – the British, American, and Nicaraguan – agree that the 1905 Harrison-Altamirano Treaty forbids such practices.  Meanwhile the principal intelligence reports focus on local sources of disturbance & unrest and the training of the Guardia, and remain unconcerned about the EDSN.  Major Metcalf’s letter to the manager of the Bonanza Mining Company (Feb. 19) asks the company to share the costs of protecting the Neptune Mine from “bandit” depredations, while one of the region’s first patrol reports (24 Feb., Lt. Meldey) offers a detailed description of conditions in the Rama district.  Especially notable too is the 12-page “Estimate of the Situation” on the Atlantic Coast by Area Commander Major Metcalf.  As before, concerns about the EDSN scarcely figure into his findings.


PERIOD MAPS

1894 mosquito shore

27 MB, library of congress

1920s Standard Fruit

6.5 mb, US National archives

1928 Rio wanks Patrol

3 mb, us national archives

1931 Moravian

2.4 mb, comenius press

1 January 1930.
Letter from Clara Grossman, Bilwi, to the Esteemed Officers of the U.S. Marines Corps at Puerto Cabezas.

8 January 1930.
Letter from Luis F. Arrecchavala, Gobernador Interne, Cabo Gracias a Dios, to Ministro de Gobernación, Managua.

9 January 1930.
Letter from Albert Fagot, Cabo Gracias a Dios, to Lt. W. C. Hall, Puerto Cabezas.  
"The acting Governor notified me this A.M. that, he had received advise from the Agent of Police at Sang Sang that AWABILA onto the Wanks river, was again occupied by Honduranian troops 8 of them, & that he was officially informed that, an other bunch was on its way to occupy Waspook. Rumors are again circulating that the Bandits under, Pedron Altamirano, are again in movements on the upper River, & commit abuses & robery of all kind. All quiet here, New Governer has not arrived yet."

13 January 1930.
7th Endorsement in the Claim of Demetrio Valle, Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas, to Brigade Quartermaster. 
 "Reference: (1) Statement of 1st Lieutenant Vernon M. Guymon, U.S. Marine Corps (in duplicate). ¶ 1. Forwarded, inviting attention to statement of 1st Lieutenant Vernon M. Guymon, U.S. Marine Corps hereto attached. ¶ 2. It is recommended that if in the opinion of the Brigade Quartermaster the attached claim is just and in due form, that the Brigade Disbursing Officer, Second Brigade, Managua, be instructed to make payment. ¶ 1. It is requested that Demetris Valle be reimbursed for damages caused by the U.S. Air Service to one thousand eight hundred pounds of cheese, at twenty five center per lb., and the boats worth twenty five dollars each, and binders for eleven laborers who were a the road from Camoapa to La Cruz de Rio Grande. These laborers deserted from the undersigned because they were frightened by bombs dropped from airplanes by the U.S. Marine Corps, at Tagua on the Quiquaste river which is a subsidiary of the Rio Grande. ¶ These bombs were dropped by the U.S.M.C. airplanes on the eleventh of April, 1929, causing the loss of two boats, one loaded with cheese and the other with passengers who were laborers enroute to work in mahogany camps on the Rio Grande. ¶ The undersigned was wounded by a fragment of one of the bombs, of which he can produce fragments. The two boats were lost with the cargoes, the boat loaded with cheese was irreparably lost, and the boat loaded with the laborers was sunk, but all the passengers got away, deserting from the undersigned who had paid their passage to La Cruz, Rio Grande. ¶ It is hoped that the complainant be reimbursed for the losses of this trip, as the men mentioned were enroute to occupation offered by various mahogany companies and as the undersigned has a regular business of bring laborers from the interior to the coast. It is sincerely hoped that the U.S.M.C. will reimburse the undersigned for the losses suffered. ¶ /s/ Demetris Valle. ¶ Any answer to the above will please be addressed to – Mr. Julio Salindo – La Cruz, Nic."

25 January 1930.
The Bluefields Weekly.  
"Moravian School Notes . . . Rio Grande Notes . . . London Disarmanent Conference Inaugurated, King George V of England Heard At the Union Club . . . "

30 January 1930.
"Interpretation of the so-called Altamirano Treaty in so far as it effects the taxing of certain Creoles on the East Coast."   Col. John Marston, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN (encl. no. 1 in Mr. London's no. 39 of 27 March 1930, PRO), p. 1.  
"1. I have before me a copy of the Altamirano Treaty signed at Managua on 19 April 1905 by representatives of the Republic of Nicaragua and Great Britain. Article III (a) of that Treaty reads as follows:- ¶ ‘The Government (Nicaraguan) will submit to the National Assembly a law exempting, for fifty years from the date of the ratification of this treaty all Mosquito Indians and the Creoles born before the year of 1894, from military service, and from all direct taxation on their persons, property, possessions, animals and means of subsistence.’ ¶ 2. One Randall Hawkins, a Creole born in Bluefields in 1868, owns in his own home a small vessel which plies regularly between Bluefields and other towns on the Escondido, Siquia and Rama rivers. Up to this year he had paid an annual tax of $4.00 on this craft. A new law or regulation has raised this tax to $10.00. This morning Hawkins’ representative appeared before me and makes the claim that under the provisions of the Treaty quoted above, Hawkins is not liable for any tax whatsoever on the vessel. ¶ 3. I have consulted the Jefe Politico, don Gilberto Lacayo, and he states that he believes such a tax is not considered a direct tax, and the man is liable, However, this official further stated that a similar contention was made some months ago by another individual and the matter referred to Managua for decision. My reply from the Government has yet been received. ¶ 4. Since this will be one of scores of such protests since the government here is taxing many Creoles born prior to 1894 on all sorts of pretexts, I request that I be advised whether or not such taxes are legally collectible in order to guide this office in case the Guardia is requested to aid in enforcing the law. ¶ sd/ John MARSTON . . . "

30 January 1930.
"Interpretation of the so-called Altamirano Treaty in so far as it effects the taxing of certain Creoles on the East Coast," with attached memo of 11 Feb. 1930 from Benjamin Abaunza Ministro de Gobernación, Managua, to Jefe Director GN  to Jefe Director GN, Managua (encl. no. 2 in Mr. London's no. 39 of 27 March 1930, PRO), p. 2.  
" . . . Enclosure No 2 in Mr. London’s No 39 of March 27, 1930 ¶ Translation. ¶ From the Minister of the Interior, Managua, ¶ To the Jefe Director of the Guardia Nacional, Managua. ¶ Managua, ¶ February 11, 1930 ¶ I have the honor to refer to your kind communication No 7/14.2/FM. ¶ In relation to the municipal taxes, the Mayor of Bluefields asked whether the Creoles and Mosquitos pay them or not. ¶ The following radio was sent him in answer thereto: ¶ ‘January 31, 1930. – Harrison-Altamirano Treaty excludes Mosquitoes and Creoles born before 1894 from all taxes. – B. Sotamayor, Acting Minister of the Interior’. ¶ Therefore if Randall Hawkins is a Creole born in Bluefields before 1894, he has no obligation whatever to pay any direct tax. ¶ In a general way it is said to you that as an essential requisite, which must be proved with the birth certificate, or in any other legal manner if they have not the latter, the one requesting the exemption must prove that he was born in the Reservation before the year 1894, if he was born after that date he cannot take avail of that concession. ¶ Very truly . . . ¶ sd/ Benj. ADAUNMZA, ¶ Ministro de Gobernacion. ¶ Note. A copy of the above was sent by General McDougal to Colonel Marston, under No 7/3.1/FM, on February 15th, for the latter’s information with reference to his memorandum of January 30 (enclosure 1)."

4 February 1930.
Monthly Record of Events, Eastern Area, January 1930.   Capt. H. D. Linscott for Major John Marston, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN, Managua, p. 1.  
". . . D. POLICE OPERATIONS. ¶ See Departmental Reports. ¶ No change in Police Conditions in general. ¶ E. INTELLIGENCE. ¶ (1) General state of territory occupied. Eastern Area Quiet. ¶ (2) Military situation. No organized enemy within the Area. ¶ (3) Economic conditions Normal. It is anticipated that during February there will be considerable depression due to the order of the UNITED FRUIT COMPANY TO STOP all new development operations in the PUNTA GORDA district. ¶ An application from certain citizens of the vicinity of LA CRUZ for a Charter to establish a WORKMAN’S BENEFIT SOCIETY was denied by the JEFE POLITICO of BLUEFIELDS. The promoters of this scheme were not persons who had any connection with laborers of the Area other than a desire to profit from the workmen’s pay, and to line their own pockets. The ringleader was a doctor of LA CRUZ who is practically without a practice and is willing to enter into any scheme for his own profit. It is the consensus of opinion of the best citizens that had this SOCIETY been established it would soon have resulted in a serious strike of the laborers on the banana plantations. Dr. ISIDRO FLORES was the man most interested in this movement, doubtless with the hope that he might thereby gain a foothold in the medical practice of LA CRUZ. ¶ (4) No friction between Guardia and Civil Population. ¶ The Civil attitude toward the Guardia is good. ¶ The press is tolerant and even appears favorably inclined. ¶ (5) Political Situation, Quiet. ¶ (6) Weather generally fair with decided decrease in rainfall. ¶ (7) Trails are improved. Travel on the upper stretches of the rivers somewhat more difficult due to lowering of the water level. ¶ (8) Condition of Telegraph and Telephone Communications. There are only two, BLUEFIELDS to RAMA and BLUEFIELDS to EL BLUFF. The former, a telegraph line, has functioned during the month with the exception of about three days. This line is least reliable during the rainy season, due breakages caused by falling timber. This line can hardly be considered reliable for military purposes though it is usable and of considerable assistance. The telephone line to El Bluff is old and rotten and is causing constant trouble, largely through lack of funds to put it in proper condition. The Guardia furnishes boats upon request of the Jefe of Communications for [section missing] . . . "

4 February 1930.
Monthly Record of Events, Eastern Area, January 1930.   Capt. H. D. Linscott for Major John Marston, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN, Managua, p. 2.  
" . . . F. CONFISCATION OF ARMS. ¶ See Departmental Reports, Northern and Southern Bluefields. ¶ G. TRAINING. ¶ The training schedule is producing good results in this Area. Inspection of the Department of Northern Bluefields showed excellent progress. In BLUEFIELDS proper all special duty men are now receiving two hours drill and instruction daily. Range practice will commence at EL BLUFF early in February, the recruits who were enlisted last fall being sent to the range first. Schools for illiterate Guardia are maintained at PUERTO CABEZAS and BLUEFIELDS. Officers at outposts are giving the instruction to illiterates there. Excellent results are being obtained in these Guardia schools, especially with the Indians who at the time of their enlistment were entirely illiterate. ¶ H. MISCELLANEOUS. ¶ Inspection of DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN BLUEFIELDS by the Area Commander showed a satisfactory and praiseworthy progress with training in that Department. Inspections of outposts prove the desirability bordering on necessity of having those outposts under a Guardia officer. Most Guardia noncommissioned officers are slow in acquiring the qualities of leadership requisite to placing them in independent charge of stations. ¶ Most public officials in the Area are cooperating with the Guardia Nacional with the exception of the DISTRICT CRIMINAL JUDGE, BLUEFIELDS. This matter has been made the subject of separate report. ¶ The general morale of officers and troops of the Area is Excellent. ¶ H. D. LINSCOTT ¶ for JOHN MARSTON"

5 February 1930.
Monthly Record of Events for the Department of Southern Bluefields for the month of January 1930.   Capt. Amor LeR. Sims, Bluefields, to Area Commander Major John Marston, Bluefields.  
"2. Cont. 6. Weather. ¶ Rainy. Improving as the dry season approaches. ¶ 7. Condition of roads and trails. ¶ Roads are nonexistent and trails very poor throughout the Department. Transportation is mainly by water. ¶ 8. Condition of telephone and telegraph communications. ¶ Good. Of little military value. ¶ F. Confiscated arms. ¶ Arms confiscated during month Serviceable: 1 Rifle, 1 Shotgun, 2 Pistols, 0 Cutting weapons ¶ Unserviceable: None ¶ Arms confiscated previously: 4 Rifles, 5 Shotguns, 20 Pistols, 0 Cutting weapons ¶ Arms turned over by marines during month: None ¶ TOTAL ARMS CONFISCATED ¶ 4 Rifles, 6 Shotguns, 22 Pistols, 0 Cutting weapons ¶ G. Training. ¶ Satisfactory progress is being made in the training schedule. A school for illiterate Guardia is maintained in Bluefields and with the exception of very few all Guardia are able to write. Actual firing on the range will start the first of February. ¶ H. Miscellaneous ¶ During the month the Area inspector inspected the outpost of Punta Gordo. The Department Commander and the Area Medical Officer inspected El Bluff, Rio Grande Bar, La Cruz and El Gallo. All men stationed in Bluefields have been inspected by the Department Medical Officer."

14 February 1930.
Invitation from David Castrillo, Manager, Teatro Cabezas, Puerto Cabezas, to Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas.  
"Dear Major Metcalf: ¶ I beg leave to bring to your attention the fact that the ‘Testro Cabezas’ is suffering considerable loss in patronage due to the fact that the populace of Puerto Cabezas and Bilwi is allowed to view motion pictures at the U. S. Marine’s open air theatre free of cost. ¶ You will doubtless recall that for more than two years prior to the advent of the cinema in your Barracks, the ‘Teatro Cabezas’ permitted the free entry of twelve Marines to each and every show with the additional concession of one-half price of the regular adult admission for all other men in the uniform of the U. S. Marines. This arrangement is still in effect, having never been cancelled, and the management of this Theatre having no desire or intention of cancelling same. ¶ You realize that the owners of this Theatre have an investment which they are striving to protect and from which they desire to derive a modest profit, but in the face of free entertainment which is being afforded by the Marine Cinema, the situation has become very acute and unless some immediate action is taken on your part to bring about a cessation of free entertainment to persons other than the U.S.. Marines, this Theatre will have to close its doors. ¶ As a matter of fact and of information to you, I might add that last evening, February 13th, our doors were thrown open and all preparations made for the regular Thursday evening performance and our box office sold only ONE fifty-cent adult admission ticket. You will, therefore, see that our patronage has so diminished that it is no longer profitable or expeditious to operate this place of amusement. Further abatement is unnecessary; it has reached the minimum of financial endurance. ¶ I will, therefore, appreciate exceedingly any action that may be taken by you in an effort to curb this practice which is ruining our business and I sincerely trust that I may be favored with a reply to this letter outlining you intentions in the matter. ¶ With the very highest esteem, I am ¶ Respectfully yours, ¶ David Castillo ¶ Manager"

19 February 1930.
Letter from Major C. H. Metcalf, Neptune, to Manager of Bonanza Mining Co., Neptune, p. 1.  
"My dear Sir: ¶ After some investigation I have found that the cost in Nicaragua of maintain the detachment of Marines guarding the property of your company at Neptune, Nicaragua, during the past six months has averaged at least $2,000 per month. The cost per month to the U.S. Government previous to that time was much greater. The total cost of keeping the Marines in this vicinity since they first occupied it amounts to many thousands of dollars – far in excess, I believe, of the equity of the company held by its present management. Your company is the principal benefactor of this expensive protection received. ¶ It is not my desire at this time to see this protection withdrawn, but I am anxious to see the cost of the same reduced as low as possible. I find by personal investigation that the Marine Corps is paying $8.80 per hundred for transporting its supplies from Tunky, Nicaragua to Neptune. $2.00 of this is for transportation to your storehouse at Bodega by boats, and handcar, and the balance for pack animal transportation to this place. The charge for transporting men with baggage from Tunky to Mirenda has been $5.00 per man and from Mirenda to Tunky $4.00 per man. ¶ You pay boatmen $3.00 in trade at your commissary to make the trip to Tunky and return to Mirenda, and $5.00 per trip if the stores are delivered in your warehouse by handcar at Bodega. You require each boatman to bring up 500 lbs. in normal water of the river, and 300 lbs. in times of low water – about four to five months of the year. You pay $1.50 for hire of boats for these trips. It is the custom to allow $.40 per boatman per trip for food. ¶ From the above it will be seen that your average profit for a boatload of supplies for 1,000 lbs. in normal water level is $7.00 not considering of course the profit you make in your commissary on the articles given in payment of the services rendered. Your profit when the river is at low water is of course reduced from the above. Your profit for transporting men is of course greater than that for stores during normal water level. ¶ In view of the cost to our Government for giving you protection as outlined above, I am of the opinion that you should be willing to furnish transportation for our men and supplies at actual cost to you. The undersigned is strongly of the opinion that labor performed for the Marine Corps should receive payment in cash as soon as possible after the services are rendered. You are paid in cash as soon as an officer is available at Neptune to make payment after services have been performed . . . "

19 February 1930.
Letter from Major C. H. Metcalf, Neptune, to Manager of Bonanza Mining Co., Neptune, p. 2.  
" . . . It is believed that the cash thus put into circulation would be of considerable benefit to this part of Nicaragua. ¶ An early reply by Marine Corps radio in connection with your decision in the above matter will be appreciated. C. M. METCALF, ¶ Major, U.S. Marine Corps. ¶ Commander, Eastern Area, Nicaragua."

1.   24 February 1930.
Report of Movements of Patrol, Lt. A. Meldey, Rama, Distrito de Sequia, p. 1.  
"1. The patrol consisted of 2 officers and 9 enlisted men including 1 Sgt. and 1 Cabo. Lt. Crabtree and 8 enlisted men from Bluefields Lt. A. Meldey and one enlisted man (plain clothes) from Rama, Lt. Medley command: Rations and ammunition were furnished from Bluefields: ¶ 19th Feb. ¶ 12:20 pm. Arrived in Providence with one Guardia (plain clothes) via portatil, met Lt. Crabtree with 8 listed men: ¶ 2:00 pm. Left with Lt. Crabtree and one enlisted man for Sta. Elena and River Side to ascertain conditions of trails, and other information from people living thereabouts, arrangements completed, returned to Providence 4:50 pm. ¶ At Sta. Elena I was informed that the thieves first appeared 11th. trying to enter the home of Sr. Pedro Sequeira, next then appeared at Monteviedo one mile above, this was on the 19th. From there they returned to Sta. Elena firing a few shots into the dwelling of Pedro Sequeira from about 100 yds. then they left returned the 15th. and 16th. the last of their presence known the 16th. when they fired two shots at the house of P. Sequier at about 9:30 am, at neither place did they enter or rob anything. The number of these marauders are estimated at seven; I doubt, in my opinion they were not more than four, possibly five. ¶ 20th Feb. ¶ 6:00 am. Left Providence, stopped at River Side, with one enlisted man, Lt. Crabtree proceeded with all men to Magnolia, arriving there he was to take the trail to centre to the place of Daniel Bolemon, suspected to be friendly with criminals, and not in accord with the present Administration. I soon followed, arriving at Magnolia at 8:55 am. Took the trail (different from that of Lt. Crabtree) at 10:10 am. Lt. Crabtree however had left about 10 minutes before my arrival there. Daniel Solomon with his brother, not divulging my mission, I observed that he had some knowledge of our visit there. He has a telephone with which he can communicate with Santa Cruz, Bluefields and Rama. The reason of my visit there was to ascertain whether he is or is not in accord with the marauders, as he would surely communicate with Santa Cruz, if he is, thus putting them on guard. I was to send Lt. Crabtree from there, while I had one man concealed within hearing distance of his telephone. This happened, but not through my man listening in wait, but after Manuel Gonzales was captured in Santa Cruz, he knew of our being there . . . "

2.   24 February 1930.
Report of Movements of Patrol, Lt. A. Meldey, Rama, Distrito de Sequia, p. 2.  
" . . . [but] information could not be sent in no other way than by telephone from his place. This proves of his sympathy with the lawless elements. ¶ 11:30 am. Returned to Magnolia. From 1:00 pm. visited places on both banks of the river, found that all without exception are friendly toward the Guardia. ¶ 6:00 pm. Lt. Crabtree with 4 enlisted men left for the River Side with orders to proceed from there the following day with one days rations and guide, via Sisi to Buena Vista, Rio Cama. I accompanied him there after which I visited Santa Elena. I returned to Magnolia at 7:45 pm. ¶ 21st. Feb. ¶ 6:15 am. Left magnolia with 5 men and all provisions via Portatil, for Mahogany Creek, from information gathered on way, I headed for Santa Cruz the place of Felipe Acuda, who from all information is the most miserable of men in the service of the Govt. he is the wire guard and located in a place where no man except a fugitive from justice would go to. This man has been reported to me on several occasions as aiding criminals to escape, he too is not in accord with the present administration. ¶ 8:30 am. Arrived at Mahogany Creek, after visiting some houses, I left for Palace Garden via Portatil arriving there 9:20 am leaving our heavy parts of supplies and belongings there, we started via paddle (in motor boat) up the creek to the Place of Felipe Acuda. ¶ 11:15 am. Sighted house and one man with two rifle men the house was rushed (100 yds) and Manuel Gonzales was recognized to be the man wanted for several robberies and rape. He did not deny his identity, but professed innocence of anything whatsoever. There were no others in the place, and after questioning him he told us that Acuda is in Bluefields, and no one else is or was there. He was accordingly arrested and cuffed while the place was searched among the articles found in the shack, was one loaded shotgun (old style) several Springfield, Krag, and cal. 38 pistol ammunition and some quantity of Black Powder (about a half pound). This powder shows to be recently purchased as the can is brand new. Asking him for his pistol, he denied to he had any, but the pistol to which the found ammunition belongs to the owner of the shack, and he has probably taken it with him to Bluefields. The place is surrounded by swamps and no one lives there nor can live there, there is a telephone over which M. Gonzales has received the news from D. Solomon, of the presence of the Guardia in the vicinity of Magnolia the day previous. ¶ 11:45 am. Left Santa Cruz with one prisoner returning to Palace Garden at 12:40 pm. via motor. ¶ 2:20 pm. Left Palace Garden for Cama, via Portatil visiting places on our way gathered no information of any value. Found all people friendly towards the Guardia. ¶ 5:55 pm. Arrived at Buena Vista, met Lt. Crabtree and his detail, he reported that nothing unusual was observed on trail, visiting two houses after passing Sisi, but nothing happened out of the ordinary, he arrived at Buena Vista at 7:30 pm. ¶ 22nd. Feb. ¶ 7:50 am. Lt. Crabtree and 5 enlisted men with one guide left via trail with 2 days rations for River Side and Santa Elena with instructions. During rest of the day, I visited places up and down the creek, but got no information of any value, most of them knew Manuel Gonzalez as a bad man, it was in this vicinity that he robbed a planter of a large sum of money . . . "

3.   24 February 1930.
Report of Movements of Patrol, Lt. A. Meldey, Rama, Distrito de Sequia, p. 3.  
" . . . [ ---  ] pm. Left Buena Vista with one prisoner and 4 Guardia with all provisions in tow of Capt. Willie Hill for Cama, there I transferred to my Portatil leaving one Guardia in charge of the prisoner on board secured in irons and proceeded to Magnolia, via Portatil.¶ 10:20 pm. Arrived in Magnolia to Camp there for the night. ¶ 7:20 am. Left Magnolia for River Side and Santa Elena to meet Lt. Crabtree. ¶ 8:05 am. Met Lt. Crabtree, he reported all well and nothing unusual happened on trail, he arrived at 4:00 pm. Left instructions as to transportation from there to Providence,. I left for Santa Klema and Providence. ¶ 9:50 am. Arrived at Providence and after arranging for return transportation and meals I proceeded to Rama arriving there at 2:20 pm. The prisoner arrived in Rama at 12:10 am. Feb. 24th. The guard had previous orders to return via same boat. Lt. Crabtree and his detail were taken aboard by Captain Willie Hill and taken as far as Providence, where he joined the rest of the detail, meals were provided by me, previous to my departure for Rama. Lt. Crabtree and his men were picked up at Providence about 1:35 am. Feb. 24 and taken to Bluefields with Rations on hand. ¶ 2. With the arrest of Manuel Gonzalez the District is rid of the most notorious individual. He has no regular abode, and would operate alone, as a rule. Until lately that he might have some followers. ¶ 3. I do not attribute the incident to be political, nor are those responsible for these molestations, do I believe to belong to any organization. Manuel Gonzalez has been a fugitive from justice, and the only for him to live, was through robbery and stealing. Nevertheless he is a dangerous man. Originally he belongs to Granada and came to this coast about 8 years ago, his ankles show the mark of chain, this would fit the rumors, that he had been a prisoner in the penitentiary, rumors that he killed a man here in the district, previous to my coming here. I could not confirm. However during my time he was arrested here on a warrant by the local court on the 22nd of January 1929 for rape, and was transferred to Bluefields for trial. ¶ 4. He admitted that B. Solomon telephoned to Acuda in Santa Cruz that the Guardias has been in Magnolia however Acuda was not there, and he took the receiver. Nevertheless the fact remains that whenever some prisoners escape from Bluefields, the wire is out of order, and the news never reaches Rama until two or three days. I was told that Acuda actually helped the murderers Pedro and Feliciano Algava with his boat, as the only trail that leads from Bluefields to this District is through the swamps of a narrow bank made for the wire, and this trail leads to Acuda’s place. Manuel Gonzales is also known as Manuel Gonzales Moncada. He claims that he never has known Victoriano [?] another man who is causing concern in this district. M. Gonzalez is a fast and a smooth talker, and dangerous to the peace and order in this district. ¶ 5. At present I am gathering evidence as to his activities, which includes three robberies, one attempt of rape, and an attempt to rob the commissary at Providence. ¶ During the entire time all men have responded with their best of ability and cheerfulness, there were no complaints or violations of any rules . . . "

4.   24 February 1930.
Report of Movements of Patrol, Lt. A. Meldey, Rama, Distrito de Sequia, p. 4.  
" . . . It is recommended that the wire guard Felipe Acuda be relieved from his position he now holds in the service of the Government as well as Daniel Solomon. ¶ Alexander Meldey ¶ 2nd. Lt. GN. C.O. Dist. of Siquia."

3 March 1930.
Monthly Record of Events, Eastern Area, February 1930, Major John Marston, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN, Managua, p. 1.  
"C. MILITARY OPERATIONS (continued) ¶ 1. Movement of Patrols and Guardia Personnel (continued) ¶ eight enlisted left to join Lieutenant MELDEY near PROVIDENCE to disperse or capture a band of seven or eight armed men reported to be in that vicinity, frightening residents and firing weapons into houses. ¶ 22 Feb. 1930. Captain SIMS returned from inspection of PUNTA GORDA. ¶ 24 Feb. 1930. Lieutenant CRABTREE and eight enlisted returned from combined BLUEFIELDS and RAMA patrol under Lieutenant MELDEY, operating below PROVIDENCE. Lieutenant MELDEY the armed band against whom they were operating had been dispersed and the reputed leader captured. (See SOUTHERN BLUEFIELDS monthly record of events for detailed report of MELDEY-CRABTREE patrol.) ¶ 26 Feb. 1930. Two Option Love Night planes arrived from MANAGUA with Dr. CORDERO REYES and Dr. CARLOS MORALES passengers. ¶ 26 Feb 1930. Same two planes with same two passengers left for PUERTO CABEZAS and CABO GRACIAS and returned to PUERTO CABEZAS. ¶ 2. Military duties performed. ¶ Police and patrol of East Coast Area of Nicaragua and Military Training. ¶ 3. No contacts with enemy forces. ¶ D. POLICE OPERATIONS. ¶ See Departmental Reports. ¶ No change in Police conditions. ¶ (1) General state of territory occupied. ¶ Eastern Area quiet. ¶ (2) Military Situation. ¶ The armed band mentioned under date of 19-24 February1930 was not a bandit band, strictly speaking, though it is believed that they might have developed into such a force. From all reports this is a group of vagabonds and escaped prisoners who are compelled to steal to live. I believe they have three or four revolvers and shot guns with which they intimidate peaceable people. They have been reported to have fired into one or two houses with no causalities. With the capture of the reputed leader I believe they will remain dispersed and leave individually for other parts of NICARAGUA. ¶ (3) Economic Conditions. ¶ A pronounced depression is being felt at the present time on this coast especially in the Department of SOUTHERN BLUEFIELDS. The sudden order of the UNITED FRUIT COMPANY to cease new development in the PUNTA GORDA DISTRICT has reacted very unfavorably upon the economic condition of the ATLANTIC COAST. A large number of . . . "

3 March 1930.
Monthly Record of Events, Eastern Area, February 1930, Major John Marston, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN, Managua, p. 2.  
" . . . INTELLIGENCE (continued) ¶ Economic Conditions (continued) ¶ laborers were suddenly thrown out of employment and, although many of them immediately left the locality and found work with the BRAGMAN’S BLUFF LUMBER COMPANY OF PUERTO CABEZAS, this did little to relieve the depression. It is true however that much of this feeling is psychological and that there is still not as much actual unemployment in the Area as would be inferred from conversation with native inhabitants. ¶ During this period the ADMINISTRATOR DE RENTES asked this office to have investigated by Guardia officers the activities of various Fiscal Agents of the area. The results of these investigations show that at one or two points the manipulations of certain Fiscal Agents have been decidedly irregular and in many respects contrary to law. This is especially true of the Fiscal Agent at LA CRUZ. The Jefe POLITICO of Bluefields also requested an investigation of the JUNTA FOMENTO at LA CRUZ (The President of the JUNTA FOMENTO and the Fiscal Agent at that place is the same individual). To date the books of the JUNTA FOMENTO do not seem to show where all the money received was spent though prediction as to the outcome is premature as the investigation is as yet incomplete. ¶ (4) No friction between the Guardia and Civil Population. ¶ The Civil attitude toward the Guardia is good. ¶ The press refrains from adverse criticism and on several occasions has been complimentary. Individuals express satisfaction toward the accomplishments of the Guardia. ¶ (5) Political Situation – Quiet. ¶ (6) Weather generally fair with little rainfall though light showers have been frequent for this time of year. ¶ (7) The few trails of the Area are greatly improved by the drier weather of the past month. Rivers are lower and routine travel is more restricted to the lower reaches of the rivers. ¶ (8) Telegraph and Telephone Communications. ¶ No change in conditions. ¶ The radio communication with MANAGUA and PUERTO CABEZAS via TROPICAL RADIO SYSTEM is excellent. There has to date been no interruption in this mode of communication. ¶ F. CONFISCATION OF ARMS. ¶ See Departmental Reports, NORTHERN and SOUTHERN BLUEFIELDS. ¶ G. TRAINING. ¶ During the month a group of eleven recruits completed range practice at EL BLUFF in the Department of SOUTHERN BLUEFIELDS. Results obtained were not all desired but the best that could be expected with the quality of ammunition furnished. This has been made the subject of separate report. During this period the military training of Guardia other than recruits was continued in both Departments in preparation for continuation of rifle practice when additional ammunition is received. The training of recruits in the Department of Northern Bluefields showed satisfactory progress. ¶ G. TRAINING.  A keen interest is being shown in the Department of NORTHERN BLUEFIELDS in the academic training of illiterate Guardia. A new school teacher was enlisted on 1 February 1930, relieving the Guard Officers of this duty. As this man speaks English, Spanish and Miskito fluently and is a man of some influence in native circles at PUERTO CABEZAS, excellent results are expected. ¶ H. MISCELLANEOUS. ¶ No remarks under this heading. ¶ JOHN MARSTON"

1.   6 March 1930.
Taxation Levied on Indians on the Mosquito Coast, cable from British Charge d'Affaires Stanford London, Managua, to British Foreign Office, London, p. 1. 
 [NOTE:  For ease of reference, documents of different dates in March 1930 clustered together in 12 consecutive images under March 6 heading.]   "Taxation levied on Indians on the Mosquito Coast. ¶ Refers to Managua despatch No. 56 of 21st June (A 5612/495/8/1929). Reports receipt, and gives text of positions from Creoles complaining of tax levied on them and shows action taken by Mr. Rees and Colonel Marston. Reports protest to Minister for Foreign Affairs who denied making statement to effect that Indians were liable to municipal and charity taxes and was informed that as the Treaty did not distinguish between national and municipal taxes, H. M. G. could not accept arguments of two years ago by Dr. Barbenas Meneses. Details Dr. Reyes’ reply and transmits copy note of 5th March setting forth arguments anew. Mr. Rees has also been asked to report. (Copy Guatemala No. 24). ¶ The Nicaraguan Gov. delay is gross; for M. London's note of 17 September 1928 (A2049) to the Minister for Foreign Affairs still remaining unanswered. M. London seems to have taken the necessary steps in this case. ¶ H. A. Caccia ¶ April 28 . . . "

2.   6 March 1930.
Taxation Levied on Indians on the Mosquito Coast, cable from British Charge d'Affaires Stanford London, Managua, to British Foreign Office, London, p. 2.  
" . . . Sir, ¶ With reference to my dispatch No 56 of June 21st last and to the previous correspondence respecting Article III (a) of the Harrison-Altimarano Treaty, I have the honour to report that Mr. Consul Rees has forwarded to me petitions from two Creoles, Charles Davis FORBES and Randall HAWKINS, complaining that a tax of eleven Cordobas a year is being demanded on their tugs, named the FORBES and the ADEILA respectively. ¶ 2. The two petitions are couched in identical terms, the material paragraphs being as follows:- ¶ ‘That your petitioner is a native of this city, born before the year 1894, and according to the Harrison-Altamirano Treaty I am exempt from all direct taxation. ¶ ‘I am the owner of the tug known by the name of FORBES and I was notified by the Governor of this Department, don Gilberto Lacayo B., that according to law I was compelled to pay to the government the tax of eleven Cordobas yearly for the matriculation of my said tug boat FORBES. ¶ ‘As a native of this city I am not compelled to pay no such direct taxation and according to the above mentioned Treaty all Creoles are exempt from such payment.’ ¶ 3. Mr. Rees also wrote that Hawkins had approached Colonel Marston, the Commander of the Guardia Nacional (see my semi-official letter of May 5, 1929, to Mr. Craigie). Colonel Marston considered that the tax was contrary to the Treaty and advised Hawkins not to pay. He then took . . . "

3.   6 March 1930.
Taxation Levied on Indians on the Mosquito Coast, cable from British Charge d'Affaires Stanford London, Managua, to British Foreign Office, London, p. 3.  
" . . . the question up with the Governor who argued that the tax is indirect and does not violate the Treaty; Colonel Marston thereupon reported the matter to General MacDougal. Colonel Marston afterwards showed Mr. Rees a radiogram received by the Governor from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs at Managua to the effect that Creoles and Indians are exempt from Direct Tax and Tasita, but that taxes levied by the Municipality and local authorities are indirect and should be collected. ¶ 4. A few days before leaving for Matagalpa I had made one of my periodical protests to the Minister for Foreign Affairs for his failure to reply to my notes of January, 1929, and had said that in my opinion his dilatoriness would not fail to make a very bad impression on His Majesty’s Government who would be driven to the conclusion that the Nicaraguan Government do not intent to implement the undertaking made by their predecessors in 1905. His Excellency replied, as usual, that they were giving the matter their very careful consideration and that I should receive a reply very shortly. ¶ 5. On my return from Matagalpa I found that Dr. Cordero Reyes had left for Bluefields. He returned on Saturday evening but it was only the day before yesterday, Tuesday, that I obtained an interview with him. I have informed him of the petitions received from Forbes and Hawkins and protested strongly at the imposition of such taxation. I did not think it desirable to refer to Mr. Rees conversation with Colonel Marston, but that morning’s LA NOTICIA, in reporting the Minister’s trip, said:- ¶ ‘From an unofficial source we know that Doctors . . . "

4.   6 March 1930.
Taxation Levied on Indians on the Mosquito Coast, cable from British Charge d'Affaires Stanford London, Managua, to British Foreign Office, London, p. 4.  
" . . . Cordero Reyes and Morales were also charged with the mission of investigating the complaint which is being made, through the English Legation in Managua, by certain Mosquitos who claim to be exempt from all taxation under the Harrison-Altamirano Treaty. The Government, however, consider that they ought to pay the municipal and charity taxes.’ ¶ I taxed His Excellency with that and he replied denying that he had made any such statement, at which I expressed my satisfaction, for, I said, the Treaty makes no distinction between national and municipal taxes and His Majesty’s Government are unable to accept the arguments advanced by Dr. Barcenas Meneses two years ago on that point. To that he could make no reply except to say that a considerable proportion of the Mosquito and Creoles are quite ready to pay the taxes. He terminated by repeating his previous assurances that this matter is engaging his government’s careful attention and that I shall receive a reply to my notes very soon, but as he has been saying that for a year or more I do not feel that it is very helpful. ¶ 6. I enclose herewith a copy of the Note which I addressed to Dr. Cordero Reyes yesterday in confirmation of Tuesday’s conversation. ¶ 7. Mr. Rees did not state under what particular enactment tax is being demanded on the two tugs. I have asked for a report on the point. ¶ 8. A copy of the dispatch has been sent to Mr. Grant Watson. ¶ I have the honour to be, ¶ With the highest respect, ¶ Sir, ¶ Your most obedient, ¶ humble servant . . . "

5.   6 March 1930.
Enclosure in Mr. London's No. 25 of March 6, 1930, from British Legation, Managua, to Dr. Manuel Cordero Reyes, Nicaraguan Minister for Foreign Affairs, Managua, p. 1.  Taxation Levied on Indians on the Mosquito Coast, cable from British Charge d'Affaires Stanford London, Managua, to British Foreign Office, London, p. 5.  
" . . . Your Excellency, ¶ Confirming the conversation which I had with Your Excellency yesterday I have the honour to recall to Your Excellency’s attention the matter of the obligations assumed by the Government of Nicaragua under Article III (a) of the Harrison-Altamirno Treaty of April 19, 1929, with regard to the exemption of the Mosquito Indians and Creoles from direct taxation. This matter was brought to Your Excellency’s personal attention in two Notes, Nos 4 and 5, which I had the honour to hand to you on January 29th of last year (1929). Since that time Your Excellency has repeatedly assured us that the question was under consideration and that replies would shortly be addressed to me on the matters raised in those Notes. More than a year has elapsed since I handed you those Notes but I have not yet received the promised replies. ¶ 2. Further, I have the honour to inform Your Excellency that I have now received complaints from two Creoles, Charles Davis Forbes and Randall Hawkins, both born in Bluefields before 1894, to the effect that the local authorities at Bluefields had demanded payment of a tax of eleven Cordobas a year on the tugs FORBES and ADEILA which they respectively own. It seem quite clear that . . . "

6.   6 March 1930.
Enclosure in Mr. London's No. 25 of March 6, 1930, from British Legation, Managua, to Dr. Manuel Cordero Reyes, Nicaraguan Minister for Foreign Affairs, Managua, p. 1.   Taxation Levied on Indians on the Mosquito Coast, cable from British Charge d'Affaires Stanford London, Managua, to British Foreign Office, London, p. 6.  
" . . . this is a direct tax on the complainants’ property and as such contrary to the spirit and intention of Article III (a) of the Harrison-Altamirano Treaty. I shall consequently be grateful if Your Excellency will be so good as to use your good offices with the competent Department of the Government with a view to the issue of whatever fresh instructions may be requisite to secure that the spirit of the above-mentioned article may be strictly observed. ¶ I avail myself of this opportunity to renew to Your Excellency the assurances of my highest consideration. ¶ sd / H. Stanford London . . . "

7.   6 March 1930.
(28 March 1930, Taxation of Mosquito Indians, p. 1.)  Taxation Levied on Indians on the Mosquito Coast, cable from British Charge d'Affaires Stanford London, Managua, to British Foreign Office, London, p. 7.  
" . . . Taxation of Mosquito Indians. ¶ Refers to Managua despatch No. 25 of 6th march (A 2719/2719/8). ¶ Transmits copies of translations correspondence between General McDougal and various authorities, showing the difference in the opinions held by the Minisers of the Interior and Foreign Affairs, the former of which is in agreement with His Majesty’s Governments’ opinion. The matter has been referred to the President for decision. In the meantime the interpretation of the Ministry of the Interior will be acted upon. As the correspondence is confidential, no further representations are being made to the Minister for Foreign Affairs. ¶ It looks as if we may now shortly expect a declaration by the Nicaraguan Govt. over this question of the interpretation of direct and indirect taxation which we raised in 1928 in connection with Article 3(a) of the Harrison Altamirano Treaty. ¶ H. A. Caccia ¶ May 16 ¶ Yes. In the meantime I hardly think we need . . . "

8.   6 March 1930.
(28 March 1930, Taxation of Mosquito Indians, p. 2.)  Taxation Levied on Indians on the Mosquito Coast, cable from British Charge d'Affaires Stanford London, Managua, to British Foreign Office, London, p. 8.  
" . . . these terms to be no action to take pending a reply from the Nicaraguan Govt to our representations. I earnestly hope that when the reply does come it will be found sufficiently satisfactory to permit us to drop this voluminous but unfruitful correspondence which seems to serve no British interest of any kind. ¶ [?] . . . "

9.   6 March 1930.
(28 March 1930, Taxation of Mosquito Indians, p. 3.)  Taxation Levied on Indians on the Mosquito Coast, cable from British Charge d'Affaires Stanford London, Managua, to British Foreign Office, London, p. 9.  
" . . . Sir, ¶ With reference to my despatch No. 25 of the 6th instant respecting the taxation of Mosquito Indians &c., I have the honour to transmit herewith copies (or translations) of the following correspondence: ¶ 1. Colonel Marston to General McDougal, January 20, 1930 ¶ 2. Minister of Interior to General McDougal, February 11, 1930 ¶ 3. Colonel Marston to General McDougal, March 6, 1930 ¶ 4. General McDougal to Mr. President Moncada, March 28, 1930 ¶ These documents were communicated to me confidentially this morning by General McDougal, the Jefe Director of the Guardia Nacional. ¶ 2. After thanking General McDougal for his courtesy in keeping me posted of this matter, I took the opportunity to express my deep appreciation in the way in which Colonel Marston is trying to help the Mosquito Indians in this and other matters. ¶ 3. It will be observed that the interpretation placed on Article III (a) by the Ministry of the Interior coincides with that of His Majesty’s Government but that it differs radically from that put forward by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and further that the point has been referred to the President for decision. In the meantime . . . "

10.   6 March 1930.
(28 March 1930, Taxation of Mosquito Indians, p. 4.)  Taxation Levied on Indians on the Mosquito Coast, cable from British Charge d'Affaires Stanford London, Managua, to British Foreign Office, London, p. 10.  
" . . . the Guardia will act on the interpretation given by the Ministry of the Interior, which both General McDougal and Colonel Marston consider to be the correct one and which they know to be that held by His Majesty’s Government. ¶ 4. In view of the very confidential manner in which the above correspondence reached me I am not making any further representations to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs beyond calling Dr. Irias’ attention (enclosure 5) to the Note which I addressed to his predecessor earlier in the month (copy enclosed in my dispatch No. 25). ¶ 5. I shall send a copy of this despatch and its enclosures to Mr. Grant Watson by the first available safe opportunity. ¶ I have the honour to be, ¶ With the highest respect, ¶ Sir, ¶ Your most obedient, ¶ humble servant . . . "

11.   6 March 1930.
Enclosure No. 3 in Mr. London's No. 39 of March 27, 1930, from Area Commander John Marston, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN, Managua, March 6, 1930.   Taxation Levied on Indians on the Mosquito Coast, cable from British Charge d'Affaires Stanford London, Managua, to British Foreign Office, London, p. 11.  
" . . . Reference: (a) My letter same subject dated 30 Jun. 1930.¶ (b) Letter JD to AC 7/3.1/FM dated 15 Feb. 1930. ¶ 1. The enclosure sent me with reference (b) which quotes a radiogram of the Minister of Gobernacion to the Alcalde of Bluefields stating, under date of 31 January 1930, that ‘HARRISON-ALTAMIRANO TREATY EXCLUDES MOSQUITOES AND CREOLES BORN BEFORE 1894 FROM ALL TAXES’ agrees, in my opinion, with the letter and spirit of the treaty. However, under date of 7 February 1930, the following radiogram was received by the Jefe Politico of Bluefields:- ¶ Managua Feb. 7th, 1226 PM ¶ JEFE POLITICO BLUEFIELDS. ¶ LOS CRIOLLOS ESTAN EXTENTOS UNICAMENTE DEL IMPUESTO DE TASA Y TASITA. LOS LOCALES MUNICIPALES Y BENEFICENCIA DEBEN PAGARLOS. RELACIONES. ¶ 2. It will be observed that these to despatches in no wise agree. The Minister of Governacion states that the Creoles and Mosquitoes are excluded from ALL taxes while the Minister of Foreign Relations states that the Creoles are exempt only from direct taxation (de tasa y tasita) but must pay local, municipal and ‘charity’ taxes. ¶ 3. The English wording of the above mentioned treaty specifically mentions ‘direct taxes’. I understand that the contention of the Nicaraguan Government is that expression ‘direct taxes’ refers only to Federal taxes, and includes only taxes [?] person but not on his possessions. I think it would be well to have the two ministries agree on the interpretation of the provisions of the treaty. Meanwhile, this office will consider the instructions of the Minister of Gobernacion the official Government viewpoint. ¶ sd/ John MARSTON. ¶ ## The creoles are exempt only from the direct taxes of Tasa and Tasita. They must pay the local, municipal and ‘charity’ taxes . . . "

12.   6 March 1930.
Enclosure No. 3 in Mr. London's No. 39 of March 27, 1930, from Area Commander John Marston, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN, Managua, March 6, 1930.   Taxation Levied on Indians on the Mosquito Coast, cable from British Charge d'Affaires Stanford London, Managua, to British Foreign Office, London, p. 12.  
" . . . Your Excellency, ¶ I have the honour to invite Your Excellency’s attention to the diverse interpretations given to the Harrison-Altamirano Treaty, which has become a matter of difficulty in the Department of Bluefields as a large number of complaints regarding taxation have been made to the Commandant of that area. ¶ At the request of the said Commandant this office asked the Minister of Gobernacion for a decision on the matter and the Minister replied to me on the 11th of February last by inter alia, quoting the text of a telegram which had been addressed to the Mayor of Bluefields, namely:- ¶ ‘ Harrison-Altamirano Treaty excludes Mosquito Indians and Creoles born before 1894 from all taxes. B. Sotomayor, Acting Minister of Gobernacion ¶ Since then we have received a further letter from the Area Commandant informing us that there are still complaints and diverse interpretations in regard to the Treaty as the Jefe Politico of Bluefields has received the following telegram:- ¶ ‘Jefe Politico, Bluefields, ¶ Creoles are only exempt from the direct taxes of Tasa and Tasita. They must pay local, municipal and charity taxes. Foreign Affairs’. ¶ It will be observed that these two telegrams are in contradiction, for the one excludes the Creoles from all taxes and the other does not. ¶ In order to decide the question and remove all doubt and controversy, I beg leave to request your Excellency to furnish this office with the authentic interpretation of the Treaty in question so that the area Commandant at Bluefields may be guided thereby in the performance of his police duties. ¶ I have….. ¶ sd/ D.C. McDOUGAL ¶ Major General ¶ Jefe Director of the ¶ Guardia Nacional"

1.   11 March 1930.
An Estimate of the Situation in the Eastern Area of Nicaragua to Determine Whether or Not It Is Necessary To Continue the Occupation Thereof by U.S. Marines and What Disposition Would Probably Be the Most Effective If the Occupation Is Continued.   Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas, p. 1.

2.   11 March 1930.
An Estimate of the Situation in the Eastern Area, Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas, p. 2.

 

3.   11 March 1930.
An Estimate of the Situation in the Eastern Area, Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas, p. 3.

 

4.   11 March 1930.
An Estimate of the Situation in the Eastern Area, Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas, p. 4.

 

5.   11 March 1930.
An Estimate of the Situation in the Eastern Area, Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas, p. 5.

 

6.   11 March 1930.
An Estimate of the Situation in the Eastern Area, Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas, p. 6.

 

7.   11 March 1930.
An Estimate of the Situation in the Eastern Area, Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas, p. 7.

 

8.   11 March 1930.
An Estimate of the Situation in the Eastern Area, Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas, p. 8.

 

9.   11 March 1930.
An Estimate of the Situation in the Eastern Area, Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas, p. 9.

 

10.   11 March 1930.
An Estimate of the Situation in the Eastern Area, Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas, p. 10.

 

11.   11 March 1930.
An Estimate of the Situation in the Eastern Area, Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas, p. 11.

 

12.   11 March 1930.
An Estimate of the Situation in the Eastern Area, Major C. H. Metcalf, Puerto Cabezas, p. 12.

 

28 March 1930 (1005).
Radiogram from Major J. Marston, Bluefields, to Jefe Director GN, Managua.  
"DO NOT REPEAT NOT RECOMMEND ESTABLISHMENT GUARDIA STATIONS IN MINING AREAS DUE TO EXPENSE AND SHORTAGE OF MEN STOP BELIEVE ALL NEEDS OF PRESENT SITUATION WILL BE MET IF I AM PERMITTED TO LEND NEPTUNE MINE MANAGER FIFTEEN REMINGTON RIFLES MODEL NINETEEN SEVENTEEN NOW IN STORE FOR LOCAL GUARDIA WHICH CASE REQUEST ONE THOUSAND ROUNDS AMMUNITION FOR SAME STOP PLEASE ADVISE 09528 MAR 30 MARSTON"

 

PREVIOUS     NEXT

 


A T L A N T I C    C O A S T    D O C S
thru 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 +

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8